Title

In a Land Far, Far Way: Writing (in) the South Pacific

Subject Area

Minorities and Multicultural Issues

Abstract

For a long time, Polynesian literature written in French and in English has remained on the margins of literary studies, not receiving the attention it deserves from scholars in the field. Works written either about the South Seas or by native islanders offer, nonetheless, numerous opportunities for relevant intellectual research. Texts from the past and present seem to dwell on the same subject matters, many of which appear in Francophone and colonial literature as a whole. Idealization versus “realization,” longing, linguistic and identity issues are recurring themes that illustrate many modern-day works originating in the Polynesian triangle. This paper focuses on how issues pertaining to French Polynesia diaspora encompass other islands and peoples in the South Pacific. Through the texts of contemporary writers, we investigate how the myth of a paradise lost coexists and/or contrasts with the reality of the physical and fictional space.

Brief Bio Note

Associate Professor of French. Born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Dr. Florido teaches all levels of French at the University of Tennessee Martin. Her main interests are the art, philosophy and literature from the Age of Enlightenment in Europe, the topic of her dissertation. She also develops research on Brazilian 20th century literature and Polynesian Literature.

Keywords

Francophone Studies, Polynesian Literature, Minority Literatures

Location

Room 218

Presentation Year

2017

Start Date

3-23-2017 9:15 AM

Embargo

10-28-2016

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Mar 23rd, 9:15 AM

In a Land Far, Far Way: Writing (in) the South Pacific

Room 218

For a long time, Polynesian literature written in French and in English has remained on the margins of literary studies, not receiving the attention it deserves from scholars in the field. Works written either about the South Seas or by native islanders offer, nonetheless, numerous opportunities for relevant intellectual research. Texts from the past and present seem to dwell on the same subject matters, many of which appear in Francophone and colonial literature as a whole. Idealization versus “realization,” longing, linguistic and identity issues are recurring themes that illustrate many modern-day works originating in the Polynesian triangle. This paper focuses on how issues pertaining to French Polynesia diaspora encompass other islands and peoples in the South Pacific. Through the texts of contemporary writers, we investigate how the myth of a paradise lost coexists and/or contrasts with the reality of the physical and fictional space.