Title

The Irony of Music

Subject Area

Spanish Peninsular Studies

Abstract

Several historians and critics, including José Antonio Maravall, have observed the general disdain held for the lower classes of society during the Spanish Golden Age, manifested oftentimes as a lack of intelligence of or inappropriate comments from these characters. Many plays of the time also include cancioneros and choruses to further the plot, inspire the story, or explain what has just transpired. The grand irony of this device is that it is usually the lower classes that provide these verses. Even though they are clearly considered to be at the bottom of the societal pyramid, they play fundamental roles in many plots. In this paper, we will examine El caballero de Olmedo by Lope de Vega, and Don Duardos by Gil Vicente. Spanning an entire century, these two works bring together the uncouth lower class and their juxtaposed verse. We will attempt to explain this irony as a feature of the subtle criticisms undertaken by the aforementioned playwrights in regards to the societies each represents.

Brief Bio Note

Adrianne Woods is a PhD student at the University of South Carolina. She holds a Master of Arts degree from the University of South Carolina and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Charleston Southern University. Her Master's thesis focused on the drama of the later Golden Age, analyzing works by Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca, and María de Zayas. Her dissertation is focused on a comparison of Renaissance and Baroque Spanish drama.

Keywords

Golden Age, Theatre, Lope de Vega, Gil Vicente, Cancioneros, Music

Location

Coastal Georgia Center

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

4-7-2016 5:20 PM

End Date

4-7-2016 5:40 PM

Embargo

11-2-2015

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Apr 7th, 5:20 PM Apr 7th, 5:40 PM

The Irony of Music

Coastal Georgia Center

Several historians and critics, including José Antonio Maravall, have observed the general disdain held for the lower classes of society during the Spanish Golden Age, manifested oftentimes as a lack of intelligence of or inappropriate comments from these characters. Many plays of the time also include cancioneros and choruses to further the plot, inspire the story, or explain what has just transpired. The grand irony of this device is that it is usually the lower classes that provide these verses. Even though they are clearly considered to be at the bottom of the societal pyramid, they play fundamental roles in many plots. In this paper, we will examine El caballero de Olmedo by Lope de Vega, and Don Duardos by Gil Vicente. Spanning an entire century, these two works bring together the uncouth lower class and their juxtaposed verse. We will attempt to explain this irony as a feature of the subtle criticisms undertaken by the aforementioned playwrights in regards to the societies each represents.