Title

Transfer Models of Third Language Acquisition and the Impacts on Instruction in a University Foreign Language Classroom

Subject Area

Hispanic Linguistics

Abstract

In the last half century, there have been many integral changes in the field of language acquisition. In 1972, Larry Selinker introduced his theory of Interlanguage, which resulted in a large number of studies focused on applying his theory of interlanguage to the language transfer in second language acquisition (L2A). In the last decade, there has been increased interest in multilingual acquisition and transfer beyond L2A. The aim of the current study is to discuss the models of transfer in third language acquisition (L3A) and examine how these models can give us insight on the best mode of instruction of L3 learners in a university foreing languages classroom setting.

We begin by defining L3A and illustrate how it is categorically different from L2A. Next, we discuss the three most widely accepted generative models of transfer affecting L3A: the Cumulative Enhancement Model, the L2 Status Factor, and the Typological Primacy Model. With a special focus on the last model, we address its importance as it relates to typologically similar languages from the Romance language family. We then present a new persepective on how to integrate the TPM transfer model with the communicative language teaching method, currently used in many U.S. universities, when both L2 and L3 learners are involved. Finally, we suggest the necessity of this particular field and the direction for future research as it relates to L3A.

Brief Bio Note

Giovanni Zimotti is from Cagnano Varano, Italy, and received his Bachelor of Arts in Intercultural and Linguistic Mediation with emphases in Spanish and English from the University of Pescara, Italy. He is currently pursuing his Master of Arts in Romance Languages, specializing in Spanish Linguistics at the University of Alabama. He is also in the process of completing his Master of Arts in Foreign Languages for Business and International Cooperation at the University of Pescara.

Reid Owens, a native of Birmingham, Alabama, is currently working on his Master of Arts in Romance Languages with an emphasis in Hispanic Linguistics at the University of Alabama. Reid completed his Bachelor of Arts degree at UA in International Business and Spanish. Upon graduating, Reid spent two years teaching English in Granada, Spain. He currently serves as Program Coordinator for Trek Abroad Spain (www.trekabroadspain.com), a Spanish language immersion program in partnership with the University of Granada Modern Language Center.

Keywords

Third language acquisition (L3A), Typological primacy model, Multilingualism, Communicative language teaching method, Interlanguage, Language transfer

Location

Room 218

Presentation Year

2015

Start Date

3-26-2015 4:30 PM

End Date

3-26-2015 5:45 PM

Embargo

5-23-2017

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Mar 26th, 4:30 PM Mar 26th, 5:45 PM

Transfer Models of Third Language Acquisition and the Impacts on Instruction in a University Foreign Language Classroom

Room 218

In the last half century, there have been many integral changes in the field of language acquisition. In 1972, Larry Selinker introduced his theory of Interlanguage, which resulted in a large number of studies focused on applying his theory of interlanguage to the language transfer in second language acquisition (L2A). In the last decade, there has been increased interest in multilingual acquisition and transfer beyond L2A. The aim of the current study is to discuss the models of transfer in third language acquisition (L3A) and examine how these models can give us insight on the best mode of instruction of L3 learners in a university foreing languages classroom setting.

We begin by defining L3A and illustrate how it is categorically different from L2A. Next, we discuss the three most widely accepted generative models of transfer affecting L3A: the Cumulative Enhancement Model, the L2 Status Factor, and the Typological Primacy Model. With a special focus on the last model, we address its importance as it relates to typologically similar languages from the Romance language family. We then present a new persepective on how to integrate the TPM transfer model with the communicative language teaching method, currently used in many U.S. universities, when both L2 and L3 learners are involved. Finally, we suggest the necessity of this particular field and the direction for future research as it relates to L3A.