Presentation Title

MALE INVOLVEMENT IN HOME CARE FOR HIV PATIENTS IN KENYA

Abstract

MEN INVOLVEMENT IN HOME CARE FOR HIV PATIENTS IN KENYA

HIV and AIDS remain a health and development challenge in Kenya with 5.9% prevalence. Home-based care emerged. There is low men involvement, little training, and advocacy. Women bear the burden. The objective was to establish the influence of training and advocacy on socio-cultural factors related to men involvement in home-based care.

Proposal Summary

An estimated 36.7 million people worldwide were living with HIV at the end of 2015 hence the need for care and support escalated. HIV/AIDS remain a major health and development challenge in Kenya as 5.9% of Kenyans are infected. Home-based care emerged as an effective method of providing cost-effective and compassionate care to those infected and affected by HIV and AIDS. There is low male involvement in home-based care services with the influence of socio-cultural factors, little knowledge, and advocacy among the rural communities. The objective of this study was to establish the influence of training and advocacy on Socio-cultural factors related to men involvement in home-based care for people living with HIV and AIDS in rural Kenya. A longitudinal quasi-experimental design study was done using qualitative and quantitative approaches for pretest and posttest surveys for the control and the trained group. The program had one-month recruiting and administering pretest survey to 80 men for control and 80 men who underwent training and advocacy. The training took another one month and three months window period and finally carried out a posttest survey. The study populations were men in household who were living with people living with HIV/AIDS. The study used Multi-stage sampling techniques in selecting the study participants. A sample size of 160 Men was used. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS (version 17) computer software and thematic content approach was used to analyze the qualitative data. The study findings showed that training intervention had a significant influence on socio-cultural practices. There was significant increase by 70% of proportion of those who agreed that men should be involved in Home Based Care for people living with HIV/AIDS (OR=0.30; 95% CI=0.14-0.63, P=0.003) and 39% more men likely to overcome stigma and accompany their wives to HIV clinics (OR=0.61; 95% CI=0.31-1.18). “I will attend home-based care services in the facilities, home, and communities because there is no stigma and discrimination”, said FGD male. “There is easy access to HIV/AIDS men patients than before because there is a reduction of fear and stigma in the community”, said KII Community health worker. Socio-cultural believes have initiated attitudes that have impacted negative stereotypes of what are the right roles for men and women in the society. Men can learn and change their socio-cultural practices to participate in HBC if more advocacy and training are conducted in rural communities. The study recommends policies and planning intervention strategies in implementing and encouraging men involvement in home-based care programme at homes in rural Kenya. Projects targeting men involvement should be initiated within HBC programs to enhance partner support and participation to help reduce stigma among HBC clients and at families or community level.

Relevance And Significance

To establish the influence of training and advocacy on socio-cultural factors related to men involvement which is gender disparities in care in home-based care activities for people living with HIV/AIDS in rural Kenya by empowering them with HBC knowledge and skills hence reduce stigma and discrimination. Also, come up with a guideline for training men in HBC involvement which does not exist in Kenya. Therefore, to contribute to the relevant policy and legislative interventions necessary for improvement towards male involvement for people living with HIV and AIDS in rural Kenya. It relates to the conference track on Advocacy programs addressing HIV-related disparities, stigma, and discrimination.

Session Format

Poster Session

Keywords

Men involvement, Training, Home-based care, HIV/AIDS, Rural Kenya

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Sep 21st, 5:30 PM Sep 21st, 7:30 PM

MALE INVOLVEMENT IN HOME CARE FOR HIV PATIENTS IN KENYA

MEN INVOLVEMENT IN HOME CARE FOR HIV PATIENTS IN KENYA

HIV and AIDS remain a health and development challenge in Kenya with 5.9% prevalence. Home-based care emerged. There is low men involvement, little training, and advocacy. Women bear the burden. The objective was to establish the influence of training and advocacy on socio-cultural factors related to men involvement in home-based care.