Title

Revolutionary Tools to Transform At-Risk Youth

Location

Navarro

Focused Area

Improving School Climate for Youth-At-Risk

Relevance to Focused Area

There are definite correlations between certain risk factors and a student’s likelihood of succeeding academically. While it is evident that this is true, a student’s true potential should not be judged on these factors. In this session, we examine structures, activities, and procedures to begin taking a proactive approach rather than a passive or reactive one with these students. Our goal is to not make generalizations or create stereotypes, rather provide schools, centers, and classrooms easy to use tools to help students wherever they may fall on the spectrum.

Primary Strand

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance to Primary Strand

The term "at-risk" can be used to describe students who are considered to have a higher probability of failing academically or dropping out of school. This can include learning disabilities, homelessness, incarceration, poverty, behavioral issues, and language learners. It is evident that different students even within the same "at-risk" category may have different innate abilities, support systems, family units, and personal characteristics that can enable them to be more resilient and successful. Thus, this session does not target individual characteristics, but rather instructional tools to help differentiate within these factors.

Brief Program Description

This session has three primary focus areas:

  1. Structures to increase cooperation, achievement, participation, engagement, communication skills, and social skills;
  2. Examine up-to-date brain research and principles, and how to use this knowledge in creating a nourishing, safe, and social classroom environment;
  3. Explore the idea that every behavior is an attempt to meet unmet needs based on seven behavioral positions.

Summary

The term "at-risk" can be used to describe students who are considered to have a higher probability of failing academically or dropping out of school. This can include:

  • learning disabilities
  • homelessness
  • incarceration
  • poverty
  • behavioral issue
  • language learners

There are definite correlations between certain risk factors and a student's likelihood of succeeding academically. While it is evident that this is true, a student's true potential should not be judged on these factors. In this session, we will examine structures, activities, and procedures to begin taking a proactive approach rather than a passive or reactive one with these students. Our goal is not to make generalizations or create stereotypes. Rather, our goal is to provide schools, centers, and classrooms easy-to-use tools to help students wherever they may fall on the spectrum. It is evident that different students even within the same "at-risk" category may have different innate abilities, support systems, family units, and personal characteristics that can enable them to be more resilient and successful. Thus, we will not target individual characteristics, but rather instructional tools to help differentiate within these factors. This session has three primary focus areas: 1. Structures and strategies to increase cooperation, achievement, participation, engagement, communication skills, and social skills; 2. Examine up-to-date brain research and principles, and how to use this knowledge in creating a nourishing, safe, and social classroom environment; 3. Explore the idea that every behavior is an attempt to meet unmet needs based on seven behavioral positions. Procedures will be used in bringing the unconscious driving need to the consciousness, and leading the student to responsible thinking. While the processes shared in this session are a crockpot and not a microwave, participants will leave with easy-to-use ingredients that immediately can be implemented with little, if any, special prep.

Evidence

We, as educators, have a choice. We can teach in ways that align with how brains naturally learn. If we do, our students learn more, learn more quickly, retain and recall more, and enjoy learning more. And, we are not as tired at the end of the day. Teaching becomes more joyful. On the other hand, we can teach in ways that do not align with how brains naturally learn. If we do, students learn less and like learning less. And, we are more exhausted at the end of the day.

In this session, and in the extensive handout provided to participants, numerous neuroscience studies (and meta-analyses of neuroscience studies) will be cited and shared with participants.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Jeff Dane has been in both private and public education for over 30 years. His career has led him to work and teach people of all ages from birth through adults. In public school, he taught at varied socioeconomic settings, as well as working in a Title I school. As a professional development consultant, Jeff has had the opportunity to lead workshops with thousands of educators throughout the United States, as well as other parts of the world. He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Dallas Baptist University, a Master of Science degree from Walden University, and has an English as a Second Language teaching endorsement. He has written articles for online magazines, as well as manuals and online courses for the teacher's certification tests in his state. As a parent, educator, and coach, Jeff believes the goal of anyone working with children should be to mold dreams, build bridges, and change lives.

Start Date

10-27-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

10-27-2017 3:15 PM

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Oct 27th, 2:00 PM Oct 27th, 3:15 PM

Revolutionary Tools to Transform At-Risk Youth

Navarro

This session has three primary focus areas:

  1. Structures to increase cooperation, achievement, participation, engagement, communication skills, and social skills;
  2. Examine up-to-date brain research and principles, and how to use this knowledge in creating a nourishing, safe, and social classroom environment;
  3. Explore the idea that every behavior is an attempt to meet unmet needs based on seven behavioral positions.