Title

Design Thinking for Dynamic Youth Work

First Presenter's Institution

Institute to Transform Child Protection

Second Presenter's Institution

NA

Third Presenter's Institution

NA

Fourth Presenter's Institution

NA

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Location

Meet & Greet Poster Reception (Harborside)

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Strand #2

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

This topic relates to the "Heart" strand as well as the "Head" strand. Design thinking, or human-centered design, offers practitioners insight into how to improve school climate, increase intrinsic motivation in youth. promote student empowerment, and contribute towards a creative learning environment. Based on a five-step process that initially comes from the world of design and engineering, design thinking gives educators and students a step by step process to create a growth mindset and increase engagement. Dynamic leaders are using design thinking to reimagine their roles and to decrease burnout and compassion fatigue among their staff.

Brief Program Description

Design thinking, or human-centered design, offers practitioners insight into how to improve school climate, increase intrinsic motivation in youth. promote student empowerment, and contribute towards a creative learning environment. Based on a five-step process that initially comes from the world of design and engineering, design thinking gives educators and students a step by step process to create a growth mindset and increase engagement. Dynamic leaders are using design thinking to reimagine their roles and to decrease burnout and compassion fatigue among their staff.

  • Learn the benefits of bringing the elements of design thinking to your work
  • Practice specific engagement and communication strategies that promote intrinsic motivation in youth
  • Apply design thinking strategies to reframe your work with students and colleagues and to challenge assumptions
  • Explore how reframing the way you do your work can be a form of self-care

Summary

If you’ve ever heard the phrase “this is the way we’ve always done it,” you know that inside the box mindset can be a road block to creative problem solving and testing new ideas in work in schools and with youth. And it doesn’t lead to increased motivation in you or those you serve. Many problems require a willingness to get creative and lean in. But even with a desire to get creative, many people just don’t know how to make that happen in their day to day work.

Design thinking is a process that broadens your perspective and helps you create better solutions no matter the type of problem. By incorporating design thinking into your work, you’ll be able to explore new alternatives and create options for your young people that didn’t exist before. This process leads to greater collaboration and solutions that recognize the needs, context and culture of everyone involved.

Learning how to think outside the box will help you reframe your work and challenge those status quo assumptions. Design thinking skills will help you in your own life as well as in your work with youth. You can encourage youth to be open-minded and try new things by role modeling these creative design thinking strategies. Join us to learn how to communicate with youth in ways that promote intrinsic motivation, and consider how reframing the way you do your work to be more collaborative and creative is itself a form of self-care.

Evidence

Design thinking, or human-centered design, has been growing in popularity in many arenas: business, engineering, mental health and education.

https://yipa.org/training/online/design-thinking-for-dynamic-youth-work/

https://designthinkingforeducators.com/

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/design-thinking-empathy-challenge-discovery-sharing-susie-wise

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Miriam Itzkowitz, MSW, LICSW is the Director of Trauma-Informed Care at the Institute to Transform Child Protection at Mitchell Hamline School of Law. In this role she develops and implements best practices for the intersection of legal services and trauma-responsive care. Miriam's clinical experience is in counseling adults and adolescents in clinical, home, and school settings. In her work at her practice, IS Counseling, Miriam use an eclectic approach to individual and couples therapy, incorporating cognitive, creative and holistic techniques to assist clients in sustaining authentic identities, coping with difficulties and overcoming trauma.

Keyword Descriptors

design, creativity, social work, new, effective

Presentation Year

March 2020

Start Date

3-9-2020 4:45 PM

End Date

3-9-2020 6:00 PM

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Mar 9th, 4:45 PM Mar 9th, 6:00 PM

Design Thinking for Dynamic Youth Work

Meet & Greet Poster Reception (Harborside)

Design thinking, or human-centered design, offers practitioners insight into how to improve school climate, increase intrinsic motivation in youth. promote student empowerment, and contribute towards a creative learning environment. Based on a five-step process that initially comes from the world of design and engineering, design thinking gives educators and students a step by step process to create a growth mindset and increase engagement. Dynamic leaders are using design thinking to reimagine their roles and to decrease burnout and compassion fatigue among their staff.

  • Learn the benefits of bringing the elements of design thinking to your work
  • Practice specific engagement and communication strategies that promote intrinsic motivation in youth
  • Apply design thinking strategies to reframe your work with students and colleagues and to challenge assumptions
  • Explore how reframing the way you do your work can be a form of self-care