Title

Applications of Video-Based Instruction to Teach Social Skills

First Presenter's Institution

University of Georgia

Second Presenter's Institution

University of Georgia

Third Presenter's Institution

University of Georgia

Fourth Presenter's Institution

NA

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Location

Session 2 (Vernon)

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Relevance

This research topic addresses the importance of improving communication skills, social interaction, and a sense of community and belonging for individuals with disabilities. By acquiring social skills and prosocial behaviors student with disabilities may develop positive relationships with peers and adults in their school environment and in their community. By having positive relationships with peers and adults, students with disabilities may show a decrease in competing behaviors that may affect their social engagement such as aggression and avoidance.

Brief Program Description

This presentation will discuss how to plan, design and implement video modeling (VM) interventions to teach social skills to individuals with special needs. Presenters will discuss the “how to” with the audience and there will be time for questions. The presenters will discuss how to plan for generalization of the targeted social skills. Research examples will be presented and discussed.

Target audience: teachers, support staff, service providers, clinicians, and administrators

Summary

Children who exhibit social deficits are more likely to withdraw from school, become juvenile delinquent and become substance abusers (Clees, Babcock, Alamoudi, & Stephens, 2019) and suffer from social anxiety (Greco & Morris, 2005). However, children with appropriate social skills are more likely to establish positive relationships with their peers, follow directions and demands in school and other settings, and have the ability to express their needs and preferences (Boudreau, and Harvey, 2013). As defined by Elliott, Racine and Busse (1995) social skills are “socially acceptable learned behaviors that enable a person to interact with others in a way that elicits positive responses and assist the person in avoiding negative responses."( p. 613). Video modeling (VM) can be presented in three different forms. Video modeling only (VMO) involves recording the model(s) presenting the target skill to be shown later to the learner (Clinton, 2015). The model(s) can be adults, peer models, or a mix of peers and adults. The second form of VM is point-of-view video modeling (POV) which refers to recording the video from the first-person (i.e., learner) point of view (at eye level), demonstrating the targeted skill (Clinton, 2015). The third form is video self-modeling (VSM), involving recording the participant him/herself presenting the target behavior/entire task; the learner later watches himself or herself presenting the target skill (Clinton, 2015). VM can be applied in clinics, classrooms, community settings, on the job, and in homes. VM can be implemented for a variety of skills and in many settings to promote generalization.

Attendees will be given an overview of the research on video modeling instruction to improve social skills. Research examples will be presented with a “how to” portion with a discussion on the design and implementation of the procedures and materials needed

Evidence

The video modeling (VM) strategy has commonality with Bandura’s social learning theory (1971). Learning by observation is the basis of studies using VM. According to Bellini and Akullian (2007), a videotape of modeled target skills is presented to the leaner, which provides the learner with the opportunity to demonstrate the target skill. The process may involve continuing to present the video model to the leaner until the learner masters the skill.

VM is an evidence-based intervention used to teach various skills to individuals with disabilities such as academic (Yakubova, Hughes, & Hornberger, 2015), daily living (Richard III & Noell, 2018), vocational (English et al., 2017), leisure activity (Kurnaz & Yanardag, 2018), and safety skills (Morgan & Miltenberger, 2017). In addition, VM has been used to increase compliance in the classroom (Diorio, Bray, Sanetti, & Kehle, 2018) and reduce disruptive behaviors (Schreimbman, Whalen, & Stahmer, 2000). VM is also an effective method to improve play skills (Lee, Lo, & Lo, 2017) and communication skills (Huist, McCarthy, Boster, & Benigno, 2018).

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Arwa Alamoudi a Special Education teacher and doctoral student at the University of Georgia in Special Education and Communication department. Her research interests focus on teaching social skills to students with ASD and applied behavioral analysis. She holds a master’s degree in Special Education with a concentration in behavior disorders from the University of South Florida.

Sarah Babcock has worked as a special educator for twelve years and most of her experience has been with teaching students with ASD and intellectual disabilities. She is a doctoral student at the University of Georgia in the area of special education with an emphasis in applied behavioral analysis. Her research area is video modeling to teach social skills and adaptive skills. She holds a Master’s degree in School Psychology from Georgia Southern University.

Dr. Clees has taught courses and mentored undergraduate and graduate students in special education for 25+ years at the University of Georgia. His areas of expertise include applied behavior analysis, self-management, social skills and transition.

Presentation Year

2020

Start Date

3-9-2020 1:15 PM

End Date

3-9-2020 2:30 PM

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Mar 9th, 1:15 PM Mar 9th, 2:30 PM

Applications of Video-Based Instruction to Teach Social Skills

Session 2 (Vernon)

This presentation will discuss how to plan, design and implement video modeling (VM) interventions to teach social skills to individuals with special needs. Presenters will discuss the “how to” with the audience and there will be time for questions. The presenters will discuss how to plan for generalization of the targeted social skills. Research examples will be presented and discussed.

Target audience: teachers, support staff, service providers, clinicians, and administrators