Title

Don’t Try to “Make” Me, Motivate Me: Strategies for Intrinsically Motivating Students in Title I Schools

First Presenter's Institution

Middle Georgia State University

Second Presenter's Institution

Middle Georgia State University

Third Presenter's Institution

Middle Georgia State University

Fourth Presenter's Institution

No 4th presenter

Fifth Presenter's Institution

no 5th presenter

Location

Poster Session (Harborside)

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Strand #2

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

This presentation addresses the “Heart” and “Head” strands of the conference. By utilizing culturally responsive motivational strategies/practices, teachers can foster the emotional needs of all students and create a more positive classroom environment that encourages and celebrates learning. As students, especially those who are placed at risk, become excited about learning, they are more likely to succeed academically which will aid in closing the achievement gap and to be better equipped for achieving future goals and realizing the American dream.

Brief Program Description

If teachers want to close the achievement gap and reach all students, they must be willing to adopt strategies/practices that MOTIVATE and INSPIRE. In this session we will provide elementary educators in Title I schools with information about the development of intrinsic motivation and motivational strategies/practices that honor and value students’ race, ethnicity, gender, class, religion, and family.

Summary

All children have the right to succeed, but not all, through no fault of their own, are equipped to do so. Unfortunately children of poverty which accounts for 51% of our nation’s children are less prepared for academic success (Rea & Zinskie, 2015), and according to the U. S. Department of Education National Center for Education Statistics (2016) children of color are more likely to live in low income households. As a result of lived circumstances and inequitable classroom practices, children of poverty may lack the motivation to succeed academically which further contributes to the growing achievement gap among our nation’s students; statistics show that students from low income families are almost twice as likely to drop out than students from middle income families and almost four times as likely as students from high income families (National Center for Educational Statistics, add date). Based on the idea that motivation to learn is a competence acquired (Brophy, 1987), teachers especially those in low socio-economic Title I schools must become aware of the rationale for motivating all students to succeed and be willing to explore and adopt culturally responsive motivational strategies/practices in low socio-economic Title I schools.

Our goal for this poster presentation is to encourage teachers to MOTIVATE and INSPIRE all of their students to set goals and to achieve them thereby providing them with the opportunity to realize the American dream. The presentation provides a review of the research on the importance of student motivation and strategies/practices that promote intrinsic motivation for achieving academic success and goals in other areas. Each participant will leave with an understanding of the importance of closing the achievement gap by ensuring that all students develop a sense of confidence in their abilities and graduate from high school; research shows that pride can be “...the most powerful agent for change and performance” (Bowman, 2007, p. 82). Participants will be provided with examples of culturally responsive strategies/practices which foster intrinsic motivation through equity, achievement, and camaraderie and can easily be implemented in their classrooms.

Evidence

Our tools, strategies, and activities are based on the following:

1. 24 years collectively in education/classroom practice in Title I schools

2. The lived experiences of one of the presenters

3. The writings and research of a multiple authors to include:

Bowman, R. F. Jr. (2007). How can students be motivated: A misplaced question? Clearing House, 81(2), 81-86.

Brophy, J. (1987). Synthesis of research on strategies for motivating students to learn. Educational Leadership, 45(2), 40-48.

Brophy, J. E. (2004). Motivating students to learn. Education Press.

Rand, J. W. (1980). Giftedness, conflict and underachievement. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

National Center for Education Statistics Institute of Education Sciences. (2016). Status and trends in the education of racial and ethnic groups 2016. https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016007.pdf

National Center for Education Statistics Institute of Education Sciences. Trends in high school dropout and completion rates in the United States. https://nces.ed.gov/programs/dropout/ind_01.asp

Rea, D. & Zinskie, C. (2015). Making the American dream a reality for all youth: Introduction to the first issue of the national youth at risk journal. National Youth At Risk Journal, 1(1). https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=&httpsredir=1&article=1014&context=nyar

Rimm, S. (2001). The underachievement syndrome: Causes and cures. Hawker Brownlow Education.

Spevak, P. A & Karinch, M. K. (2000). Empowering underachievers: How to guide failing kids (8-18) to personal excellence. New Horizon Press.

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Rhonda Amerson is an assistant professor in the Department of Teacher Education and Social Work at Middle Georgia State University. Prior to entering the field of higher education, she taught for 23 years in varied educational settings ranging from grades 2-8; the majority of these years were spent working with at-risk students in Title I schools. Dr. Amerson was recognized as a Georgia Master Teacher in 2011. She holds a Masters and Ed.S. in Middle Grades Education and an Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Georgia Southern University, where she conducted dissertation research on the aspirations of rural white adolescent males. Her research interests include integrated curriculum, development of classroom community, and aspirations of youth.

Mrs. Marlene Dietz is a senior teacher candidate at Middle Georgia State University. After obtaining her bachelor’s degree in Elementary and Special Education in May 2019, she plans to enter the Early Childhood Education Master’s program at Georgia College and State University. She is an ardent advocate for early childhood literacy and finding ways to motivate children to learn.

Mrs. Brittany Johnson is a senior teacher candidate at Middle Georgia State University. After obtaining her Bachelor's Degree in Elementary and Special Education in May 2019, she plans to enter the Elementary Education Master’s program at Old Dominion University. Mrs. Johnson was a low income student in Title 1 schools all throughout elementary, middle, and high school in Chesapeake, Virginia. The experiences she gained at these schools fueled her passion to be a teacher that could make a difference in her future students’ lives.

Keyword Descriptors

intrinsic motivation, elementary students, achievement, classroom environment

Presentation Year

March 2019

Start Date

3-5-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

3-5-2019 5:30 PM

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Mar 5th, 4:00 PM Mar 5th, 5:30 PM

Don’t Try to “Make” Me, Motivate Me: Strategies for Intrinsically Motivating Students in Title I Schools

Poster Session (Harborside)

If teachers want to close the achievement gap and reach all students, they must be willing to adopt strategies/practices that MOTIVATE and INSPIRE. In this session we will provide elementary educators in Title I schools with information about the development of intrinsic motivation and motivational strategies/practices that honor and value students’ race, ethnicity, gender, class, religion, and family.