Title

Research and Applications in Video-Based Social Skills Instruction

First Presenter's Institution

University of Georgia

Second Presenter's Institution

Barnett Shoals Elementary School

Third Presenter's Institution

University of Georgia

Fourth Presenter's Institution

University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Relevance

Video-based social skills strategies are relevant in school, at home and in the community., and thus relevant to the Social and Emotional Skills strand.The research study to be presented, video modeling of greeting skills, exemplifies video-based strategies that are designed to promote acquisition and generalization of various social skills (e.g., compliments, greetings, following directions). Such prosocial skills can improve peer-to-peer and teacher-to-student relationships, as well as student learning outcomes.

Brief Program Description

This presentation will demonstrate how to design and implement video modeling (VM) interventions to teach social skills. Attendees (teachers, support staff, clinicians, administrators) will be able to describe the “how to” of these elements, evaluation of the intervention, and how to plan for generalization of skills. A Study will be presented that employed VM to teach greeting skills to students with learning/behavioral challenges.

Summary

Positive peer-to-peer and peer-to-teacher interactions can decrease challenging behaviors and improve academic outcomes (Clees & Greene, 2014; Clinton & Clees, 2018; Kauffman, and Landrum 2009). Such social skills are exemplified by “making greetings,” "following-teacher-directions," "making compliments," and "sharing." Teaching appropriate social skills has also been shown to decrease school violence and improve the overall school climate to support learning (Walker, Ramsey and gresham, 2004). The social skills model to be presented is research-based and can be modified to fit varying skills and settings to promote generalization. The model relates specifically to video-based instruction (video modeling; VM). Attendees will be given a brief overview of the breadth of research on video modeling instruction of social skills, followed by the bulk of the presentation, which will focus on pragmatic implementation of the procedures (a "how to" description, with materials, of design and implementation of the video modeling instruction). The procedures will be exemplified by an experimental study that demonstrated the effectiveness of VM in teaching 4 students with learning and behavioral challenges to initiate greetings to peers and adults.

Learning outcomes:

Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe elements of design and implementation of video-modeling social skills instruction of greetings and other social skills.
  • Describe the theoretical framework for generalization of skills
  • Describe data collection procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of the social skills instruction.

Evidence

Positive peer-to-peer and peer-to-teacher interactions can decrease challenging behaviors and improve academic outcomes (Clees & Greene, 2014; Clinton & Clees, 2018; Kauffman, and Landrum 2009). Such social skills are exemplified by “making greetings,” "following-teacher-directions," "making compliments," and "sharing." Teaching appropriate social skills has also been shown to decrease school violence and improve the overall school climate to support learning (Walker, Ramsey and gresham, 2004). The effectiveness of computer-based technologies that include a video modeling (VM) component has been noted (Greene et al., 2013; Kourassanis, Jones, & Fienup, 2015; The effectiveness of interactive, computer-based technologies that include a VM component has been noted (Greene et al., 2013; Kourassanis, Jones, & Fienup, 2015). The feasibility of using VM in school settings has also been demonstrated, and VM has numerous benefits, including demonstration of target skills in relevant contexts and the use of multiple stimulus and response exemplars (Clees & Greene, 2014; Clinton & Clees, 2018; Macpherson et al., 2015). In addition, increased social competence and improved peer-to-peer and teacher-to-peer interactions in school settings have been linked to improved academic outcomes (Clinton & Clees, 2018; Kauffman and Landrum, 2009) and cooperative activities (Clees and Greene, 2014). By increasing teachers' understanding of the factors that promote generalization (Stokes and Osnes, 1989) within a social skills instructional model, school climate and individual student success can be enhanced. The social skills research study and model to be presented is research-based and can be modified to fit varying skills and settings to promote generalization. The design of the video modeling instruction relies on the work of Gresham and Walker, both of whom have framed a conceptual basis for social skills instruction. Walker has also developed social skills curricula on which components of the model are based. The model to be presented also relies heavily on the research by Stokes and Osnes related to factors that promote generalization.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Clees has taught courses and mentored undergraduate and graduate students in special education for 25+ years at the University of Georgia. His areas of expertise include applied behavior analysis, self-management, social skills and transition.

Sarah Babcock is a doctoral student in Special Education at the University of georgia. She has many years of experience in teaching students with behavioral challenges, and currently teaches students with autism spectrum disorder and developmental disabilities.

Arwa Alamoudi i a doctoral student at the University of Georgia. She has experience working with students with challenging behaviors in Saudi Arabia and the US, and is focusing on applied behavior analysis.

Dr. Stephens has over thirty years of experience working to support individuals with learning and behavioral challenges in the community and schools. Twenty six years in University teacher preparation including leadership positions as past Department Chairperson and present program coordinator for the Intellectual Disabilities licensure program at the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire

Keyword Descriptors

social skills instruction, video modeling, generalization, peer/peer relations, teacher/student relations

Presentation Year

2019

Start Date

3-6-2019 9:45 AM

End Date

3-6-2019 11:00 AM

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Mar 6th, 9:45 AM Mar 6th, 11:00 AM

Research and Applications in Video-Based Social Skills Instruction

This presentation will demonstrate how to design and implement video modeling (VM) interventions to teach social skills. Attendees (teachers, support staff, clinicians, administrators) will be able to describe the “how to” of these elements, evaluation of the intervention, and how to plan for generalization of skills. A Study will be presented that employed VM to teach greeting skills to students with learning/behavioral challenges.