First Presenter's Institution

University of South Carolina

Second Presenter's Institution

University of South Carolina

Third Presenter's Institution

University of South Carolina

Fourth Presenter's Institution

South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Location

Session 6 (Percival)

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

Presenter will provide.

Brief Program Description

This interactive, panel presentation will challenge deficit perspectives as four teacher-researchers share their experiences reading and writing with incarcerated youth. Evidence-based curriculum and pedagogy that expands literacy instruction in correctional facilities will be shared, and the voices of students and teachers will be validated.

Summary

This interactive, panel presentation will challenge deficit perspectives as four teacher-researchers share their experiences reading and writing with incarcerated youth. Evidence-based curriculum and pedagogy that expands literacy instruction in correctional facilities will be shared, and the voices of students and teachers will be validated.

Evidence

Presenter will provide.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Mary E. Styslinger is an associate professor of English and Literacy Education at the University of South Carolina where she directs the Midlands Writing Project, a site of the National Writing Project. She served as secondary program coordinator and advises students pursuing MT, MAT, MEd, and Ph.D. degrees in secondary English and Literacy education. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in English and literacy methods. She has published articles in English Journal, Voices from the Middle, Language Arts, Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Kappan and is a frequent presenter at the National Council of Teachers of English, International Reading Association, and the Literacy Research Association conferences. She has received grants to fund her research and professional development with teachers from the Arthur Vining Davis Foundation as well as the National Writing Project. She is passionate in her research efforts to interweave literacy into the secondary English curriculum and across the disciplines. Recently she has focused her attention on marginalized and at-risk youth including those incarcerated and those on the autism spectrum.

Janie Goodman is a clinical assistant professor in the undergraduate Middle Level Education program and the graduate Master of Education in Teaching program. She taught middle level English Language Arts for 32 years prior to joining the faculty at USC. Goodman teaches undergraduate courses in ELA assessment, methods and materials, and content area literacy. She also teaches graduate courses in teacher leadership and ideas and issues in teaching. Goodman is a member of the USC Accreditation Team for SCISA (South Carolina Independent School Association).

Victoria Oglan is a Clinical Associate Professor in Secondary English Education and Language and Literacy. She taught high school English in Canada for 31 years, retired and joined the USC faculty in 2003. She teaches graduate classes in secondary English methodology, teacher research, classroom assessment, and content literacy. As well, she conducts workshops and presentations on a variety of topics related to K-12 education. She is the Co-Director of the Midlands Writing Project (MWP), Co-Director of Project RAISSE (Reading Assistance Initiative for Secondary School Educators), Director of the USC Accreditation Team for SCISA (South Carolina Independent School Association), on the Writing Improvement Network (WIN) Board of Directors, and has served as a member of the SCRI Teaching Team working with middle school literacy coaches. Her areas of research interest include adolescent/content literacy, high school reading/writing workshop, the impact of technology on teaching.

Timothy Bunch. Communities In Schools, South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice, Columbia, S.C.; English and creative writing, grades 7-12; years full-time teaching: 15. He serves as coordinator and lead teacher for a one-room schoolhouse "behind the fence," a prison partnership with CIS, a non-profit stay-in-school agency. Provides respect, compassion, guidance and "tough love" discipline to 24-32 incarcerated boys with academic potential, ages 12-17; the average student gains at least two grade levels in math and English each year, and only 35% have ended up back in prison, compared to national recommitment estimates of 60% or more. "When a young person crosses the threshold of my classroom, his life will be changed forever; as will mine." Counsels students to focus not on unfairness but on choices: "It's 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react." Addresses empathy and remorse by having students write poems responding to Holocaust films such as Schindler's List and Life Is Beautiful. Founded The Insiders crime prevention/community service public speaking program in 1993; students speak to kids all over the state. Uses writing to get kids to probe their hearts: "The one thing (on which) you have no option is you have to write. You have to write." Models creative writing elective after Midlands Writing Project workshop he attended; shares his own poetry and invites students to read from their leather-bound journals. Builds world awareness by bringing in international students to speak; students held a car wash to raise $800 for the five siblings of one African orphan. "I never look at myself as a pioneer or a leader. l'm a normal person trying to help kids. At our core, we're not that much different."

Presentation Year

2019

Start Date

3-5-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

3-5-2019 2:15 PM

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Mar 5th, 1:00 PM Mar 5th, 2:15 PM

Reading, Writing, and Learning with Incarcerated Youth

Session 6 (Percival)

This interactive, panel presentation will challenge deficit perspectives as four teacher-researchers share their experiences reading and writing with incarcerated youth. Evidence-based curriculum and pedagogy that expands literacy instruction in correctional facilities will be shared, and the voices of students and teachers will be validated.