First Presenter's Institution

University of West Georgia

Second Presenter's Institution

Northside Elementary School

Third Presenter's Institution

University of West Georgia

Fourth Presenter's Institution

Carroll County Wellness Court

Fifth Presenter's Institution

Department of Juvenile Justice

Location

Session 1 (Scarbrough 3)

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

Presenter will provide.

Brief Program Description

Far too many youths, known as being “high-risk,” are not faring well at life and in school. To accompany this problem, most educators lack the ability to effectively respond to these youths. Motivated by a desire to provide educators and those working with youth at risk with a much-needed alternative to emotionally draining conventional classroom cultures, our intent is to move beyond the deforming rhetoric of behaviorism and lay claim to moral and spiritual foundations that bring both groups together in a setting that promotes a culture of dialogue, openness, trust, and caring.

Summary

Far too many youths, known as being “high-risk,” are not faring well at life and in school. To accompany this problem, most educators lack the ability to effectively respond to these youths. Motivated by a desire to provide educators and those working with youth at risk with a much-needed alternative to emotionally draining conventional classroom cultures, our intent is to move beyond the deforming rhetoric of behaviorism and lay claim to moral and spiritual foundations that bring both groups together in a setting that promotes a culture of dialogue, openness, trust, and caring.

Evidence

Presenter will provide.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Thomas Peterson has served for 27 years as a professor of Critical Theory and Philosophy of Education at the University of West Georgia (UWG). He teaches courses including philosophy, critical theory, and history. His research interests include teachers’ inner-life, teacher burnout/renewal, growing a spiritual classroom, and igniting a SPARK in challenging youth. The son of a preacher, Tom lived his formative years in South East Asia. Prior to his appointment at UWG, he was an elementary/middle school principal in North Carolina, and an art teacher in California and Maryland, World Masters gold medal winner in badminton, flight instructor, and father to three sons and five grandchildren.

Mildred Rabun has worked with the Spark Mentoring Program under Dr. Tom Peterson for the last four years. During this time, she has found a true passion for igniting hope in the eyes of students who feel hopeless. Mildred recently graduated from the University of West Georgia with a Bachelors in Early Childhood Education and just started her second year of teaching at Northside Elementary School in Newnan, Georgia. In her free time, she kayaks with her husband and their dog, Stella.

Rebecca Gaylor is a graduate student of psychology, aspiring to become a mental health professional. Her areas of focus are Humanistic and Critical Psychology, as well as nature-based and animal-assisted therapies. Her professional background includes working as program manager for an outpatient behavioral healthcare therapeutic farm program as well as director of junior leadership at a young women’s nature-based empowerment camp. She’s passionate about working with young people, especially at-risk youth, as she finds joy in creating community and discovering their unique gifts.

Tom Parmer is the juvenile court judge of Carroll County, Georgia. He presides over all dependency and delinquency cases arising in Carroll County. He also presides over the Carroll Juvenile Wellness Court, a juvenile drug treatment court, and the Carroll County Family Treatment Court, a drug treatment court for parents whose children have been placed in DFCS custody. Tom received his Bachelor of Arts from Vanderbilt University in 1987 and his Juris Doctorate from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1990.

Stephanie Love has been a Juvenile Probation/Parole Specialist (JPPS) with the Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) since 2009, with previous work with the Carroll County Department of Family and Children Services, Morning Star Counseling Services, the Georgia Department of Corrections, and Inner Harbor Hospital. As a member of the DJJ, Love is dedicated to their mission and to seeking ways to refine existing programs and cultivate new innovative and effective programs that encourage youthful offenders to become successful members of society.

Presentation Year

2019

Start Date

3-4-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

3-4-2019 11:45 AM

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Mar 4th, 10:30 AM Mar 4th, 11:45 AM

Igniting a SPARK in "Dead-Eyed" Youth

Session 1 (Scarbrough 3)

Far too many youths, known as being “high-risk,” are not faring well at life and in school. To accompany this problem, most educators lack the ability to effectively respond to these youths. Motivated by a desire to provide educators and those working with youth at risk with a much-needed alternative to emotionally draining conventional classroom cultures, our intent is to move beyond the deforming rhetoric of behaviorism and lay claim to moral and spiritual foundations that bring both groups together in a setting that promotes a culture of dialogue, openness, trust, and caring.