Title

Evaluating Predictors of Treatment Seeking Behaviors Across Race

First Presenter's Institution

Texas Tech University

Second Presenter's Institution

na

Third Presenter's Institution

NA

Fourth Presenter's Institution

NA

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Location

Poster Session (Harborside)

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

Heart- This poster helps individuals see the importance of school connectedness for adolescents in order to promote social and emotional skills.

Health- This poster helps individuals understand reasons adolescents may seek treatment for mental health and substance use.

Brief Program Description

As we seek to better serve minority populations in the school system and their overall health, it is imperative that we first understand what adolescents are seeking help and why others may not be. From this poster, you will be able to apply research back to your home campus on differences in treatment seeking behavior among youth in schools.

Summary

Families with children and adolescents in the school systems are faced with the possibility for school troubles, as well as, potential feelings of connectedness with their school system that may affect students’ ability to seek help. Due to the large role the school environment has on the child’s emotional welfare and social development, trouble at school may be a critical contributor to the need of seeking mental health treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate predictors of treatment seeking behaviors across racial groups in a school setting. This study evaluated differences across race in utilization of substance use treatment and emotional counseling, the level at which designated factors are experienced across race, and the moderating effect said factors have on treatment seeking behaviors across race. Results of this study showed that the Black and the Asian group sought treatment at a decreased rate as compared to the White group. There exists an underrepresentation of ethnic minorities both in research and in program development. In order to meet the needs and offer proactive support in avoidance of negative consequences, the influence of the school system on students of different ethnic and racial backgrounds must be considered. This research suggests that to better provide competent and culture specific treatment to minority clients, we must first begin with evaluating the factors that are contributing to treatment seeking behaviors.

Evidence

This study used the ADD Health data set. The study also used research from the field that indicates what individuals are seeking treatment. This evidenced based information can help schools, mental health professionals, and families be better informed on how to best serve the minority individuals of the community. This poster is the basis of important information that can later inform best practices.

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Cydney Schleiden is a Doctoral Student in Marriage and Family Therapy at Texas Tech University. She has her associate’s license in marriage and family therapy. She has worked clinically in a Juvenile Justice center, and maintains a focus on minority populations in her clinical work. She currently works for the Center for Adolescent Resiliency at Texas Tech for the Community Advocacy Project for Students that helps students who are at risk in school learn skills to help them succeed.

Keyword Descriptors

mental health, schools, treatment, substance use, race

Presentation Year

2019

Start Date

3-5-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

3-5-2019 5:30 PM

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Mar 5th, 4:00 PM Mar 5th, 5:30 PM

Evaluating Predictors of Treatment Seeking Behaviors Across Race

Poster Session (Harborside)

As we seek to better serve minority populations in the school system and their overall health, it is imperative that we first understand what adolescents are seeking help and why others may not be. From this poster, you will be able to apply research back to your home campus on differences in treatment seeking behavior among youth in schools.