Title

Developing Identity and Third Culture Kids

First Presenter's Institution

Georgia Southern University

Second Presenter's Institution

NA

Third Presenter's Institution

NA

Fourth Presenter's Institution

NA

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Location

Harborside East Center

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

This presentation is relevant to Strand 1 Academic Achievement and Strand 2 Social Emotional Skills these both connects to identity development among adolescents who were educated in countries outside of their native country.

Brief Program Description

The main issues discussed within the research on Third Culture Kids (TCKs) immediately revealed social factors such as identity and transition. The current literature emphasizes the critical nature of the transition period for TCKs. It also reveals the struggle that formation of identity can be for TCKs. These two topics, while obviously different, also appear to have extensive overlap. Transitions have a huge impact on TCKs’ identity. During these transition periods, school is one thing that most students are involved in, and therefore immensely affected by changes. The presence of transition programs in those schools, as well as individual teachers’ support, have an effect on TCKs and their progress (Bates, 2013). This presentation will discuss the identity development of TCKs who are currently college aged and navigated through schools as a TCK.

Summary

There are limited studies on identity and transition among adolescents. The variability of every TCK’s personality and being, along with multiple other factors of immeasurable and fluid nature, all come together to conclude that the effect of transition on identity cannot be generalized to be either good or bad. However this researcher explored the experiences of TCK’s to better understand dilemmas with transitions and how that impacted their identity or sense of belonging.

Evidence

As Walters (2009) revealed, a major step in identity development appears to be when TCKs form relationships with other TCKs and realize they are not alone in their experiences or worldview. My aim of the research is to detail the experiences of TCKs so others will gain a better understanding of the challenges to belongingness and how that might affect an individual's academic development.

Bates, D. (2013). The perceptions of third culture kids of being different to children of their home country. International Journal of Nursing Education, 5(2), 122-126.

Walters, K., & Auton-Cuff, F. (2009). A story to tell: the identity development of women growing up as third culture kids. Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 12(7), 755-772.

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Amy Rustine is a senior and honor student attending Georgia Southern University. In December 2018, Amy will complete her degree in Early Childhood Education.

Keyword Descriptors

Identity development, English as Second Language, Undergraduate Research

Presentation Year

2018

Start Date

3-6-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

3-6-2018 5:30 PM

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Mar 6th, 4:00 PM Mar 6th, 5:30 PM

Developing Identity and Third Culture Kids

Harborside East Center

The main issues discussed within the research on Third Culture Kids (TCKs) immediately revealed social factors such as identity and transition. The current literature emphasizes the critical nature of the transition period for TCKs. It also reveals the struggle that formation of identity can be for TCKs. These two topics, while obviously different, also appear to have extensive overlap. Transitions have a huge impact on TCKs’ identity. During these transition periods, school is one thing that most students are involved in, and therefore immensely affected by changes. The presence of transition programs in those schools, as well as individual teachers’ support, have an effect on TCKs and their progress (Bates, 2013). This presentation will discuss the identity development of TCKs who are currently college aged and navigated through schools as a TCK.