First Presenter's Institution

Orchard Human Services,, Inc.

Second Presenter's Institution

NA

Third Presenter's Institution

N/A

Fourth Presenter's Institution

NA

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Strand #2

Mental & Physical Health

Relevance

The presentation supports a developmental perspective of Juvenile Justice that explains strategies and orientations that promote 1) Social and Emotional Skills and 2) Mental and Physical Health. By identifying and meeting the developmental status and needs of youth who have contact with the Juvenile Justice System, professionals will be able to propel youth forward along their personal developmental pathway in the direction of efficacy and life satisfaction. In doing so, youth can be diverted from Juvenile Justice involvement or transitioned out of Juvenile Justice placement.

Brief Program Description

Explore specific factors contribute to the overwhelming and downward spiraling phenomenon of youth involvement with the Juvenile Justice system. Identify Juvenile Justice crossover, DMC (Disproportionate Minority Contact), and trauma-informed and developmentally responsive engagement to promote youth well-being, lawfulness and good citizenship. Identify strategies, protocols, and practices that prevent Juvenile Justice first contact, reduce DMC, and support successful youth re-entry and successful integration into family and community. Includes introduction to critical mental health, habilitative, and sociocutural factors implicated in Juvenile Justice involvement.

Summary

Developmentally oriented factors are implicated in the pathways that lead to Juvenile Justice contact. A trauma-informed and developmentally responsive approach to youth engagement can divert youth who have early contact with the Juvenile Justice system, support the reentry of youth who were placed in a facility, and ease the burden of DMC (Disproportionate Minority Contact). Explore the phenomenology of DMC; identify critical factors that lead to Juvenile Justice contact; and recognize evidence-based strategies and practices that promote youth learning, growth, development, and well-being. Critical concepts include developmental responsiveness, habilitation, and overview of pathways that lead to Juvenile Justice involvement. Trauma-informed, mental health supportive, and developmentally appropriate strategies are discussed as solutions for the future. Included is an introduction to community impact on youth challenges as well as strategies for promoting better youth outcomes through community outreach.

Evidence

This presentation draws from current evidence-based information that explains the phenomenology of youth involvement with Juvenile Justice systems as well as empirically supported strategies that both divert youth from first contact as well as support youth learning and development (including social, emotional, behavioral, and mental health-oriented factors) to promote reentry, lawfulness, and youth well-being. Academic literature also clearly explains the phenomenology of Disproportionate Minority Contact, including contributing factors and intervention strategies. Following is the list of references:

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American Academy of Pediatrics, & Bright Futures. (2016). Recommendations for preventive pediatric health care. Retrieved from https://www.aap.org/en-us/Documents/periodicity_schedule.pdf

Anakwenze, U., & Zuberi, D. (2013). Mental health and poverty in the inner city. Health & Social Work, 38(3), 147-157. doi: 10.1093/hsw/hlt013

Baker, L.L., & Jaffe, P.G. (2003). Youth exposed to domestic violence. London, ON: Centre for Children & Families in the Justice System. Retrieved from http://www.lfcc.on.ca/Youth_Justice_Handbook.pdf

Butts, J.A., Bazemore, G., & Saa Meroe, A. (2010). Positive youth justice: Framing justice interventions using the concepts of positive youth development. Washington, DC: Coalition for Juvenile Justice. https://positiveyouthjustice.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/pyj2010.pdf

Calkins, S.D. (2010). Psychobiological models of adolescent risk: Implications for prevention and intervention. Developmental Psychobiology, 52(3), 213-215.

Calleja, N.C., Dadah, A.M., Fisher, J., & Fernandez, M. (2017). Reducing juvenile recidivism through specialized reentry services: A second chance act project. Journal of Juvenile Justice 5(3), 6-16.

Chan, C., Liu, C., Su, W., Huang, S., & Lin, K. (2007). Factors associated with the diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorders: A population-based longitudinal study. Pediatrics, 119(2), e435-e443. doi: 10.1542/peds.2006-1477

Clossey, L., Mehnert, K., & Silva, S. (2011). Using appreciative inquiry to facilitate implementation of the recovery model in mental health agencies. Health & Social Work, 36(4), 259-266. doi: 10.1093/hsw/36.4.259

Development Group Services, Inc. (2014). Gang Prevention: Literature review. Washington, DC.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Retrieved from http://www.ojjdp.gov/mpg/litreviews/Gang_Prevention.pdf

Delobel-Ayoub, M., Ehlinger, V., Klapouszczak, D., Maffre, T., Raynaud, J.P., Delpierre, C., & Arnaud, C. (2015) Socioeconomic disparities and prevalence of autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability. PLoSONE10(11), e0141964. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0141964

Donisch, K., Bray, C., & Gewirtz, A. (2016). Child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, and education providers’ conceptualizations of trauma-informed practice. Child Maltreatment, 21(2), 125-134. doi: 10.1177/1077559516633304

Engen, R. L., Steen, S., & Bridges, G. S. (2002). Racial disparities in the punishment of youth: A theoretical and empirical assessment of the literature. Social Problems, 49(2), 194–220. doi: 10.1525/sp.2002.49.2.194

Ericson, R.D., & Eckberg, D.A. (2016). Racial disparity in juvenile diversion: The impact of focal concerns and organizational coupling. Race and Justice, 6(1), 35-36. doi: 10.1177/2153368715594848

Farn, A., & Adams, J. (2016). Education and interagency collaboration: A lifeline for justice-involved youth. Washington, DC: Center for Juvenile Justice Reform. Retrieved from http://cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Lifeline-for-Justice-Involved-Youth-August_2016.pdf

Feld, B.C. (1988). The juvenile court meets the principle of offense: Punishment, treatment, and the difference it makes. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Law School. Retrieved from http://scholarship.law.umn.edu/faculty_articles/285.

Finkelhor, D., Turner, H., Ormrod, R., Hamby, S., & Kracke, K. (2009). Children’s exposure to violence: A national comprehensive survey. Washington, DC: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/227744.pdf

Ford, J.D., Kerig, P.K. Desai, H., & Feierman, J. (2016). Psychosocial interventions for traumatized youth in the juvenile justice system: Research, evidence base, and clinical/legal challenges. Journal of Juvenile Justice, 5(1), 31-49. Retrieved from http://www.journalofjuvjustice.org/JOJJ0501/JOJJ0501.pdf

Glisson, C., & Green, P. (2006). The effects of organization culture and climate on the access to mental health care in child welfare and juvenile justice systems. Administration & Policy in Mental Health Services Research, 33(4), 433-448.

Green, A. E., Albanese, B. J., Cafri, G., & Aarons, G. A. (2014). Leadership, organizational climate, and working alliance in a children’s mental health service system. Community Mental Health Journal, 50(7), 771–777. doi: 10.1007/ s10597-013-9668-5

Hackman, D.A., Gallop, R., Evans, G.W., & Farah, M.J. (2015). Socioeconomic status and executive function: Developmental trajectories and mediation. Developmental Science, 18(5), 686-702. doi: 10.1111/desc.12246

Hair, N.L., Hanson, J.L., Wolfe, B.L., & Pollak, S.D. (2015). Association of child poverty, brain development, and academic achievement. JAMA Pediatrics, 169(9), 822-829. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.1475

Howell, J.D. (2000). Youth gang programs and strategies. Washington D.C.: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/171154.pdf

Leone, P., & Weinberg, L. (2012). Educational needs of children and youth in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems. Washington, DC: Georgetown University. Retrieved from https://cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EducationalNeedsofChildrenandYouth_May2010.pdf

Lewis-Morrarty, E., Degnan, K.A., Pine, D.S., Henderson, H.A., & Fox, N.A. (2015). Infant attachment security and early childhood behavioral inhibition interact to predict adolescent social anxiety symptoms. Child Development, 86(2), 598-613. doi: 10.1111/cdev.12336

Leiber, M.J., Peck, J.H., Beaudry-Cyr, M. (2016). The likelihood of a “youth discount” in juvenile court sanctions: The influence of offender race, gender, and age. Race and Justice, 6(1), 5-34. doi: 10.1177/2153368715595088

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Shanahan, R., & diZerega, M. (2016). Identifying, engaging, and empowering families: A charge for juvenile justice agencies. Washington, DC: Center for Juvenile Justice Reform.

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Stevens, T., & Morash, M. (2015). Racial/Ethic disparities in boys’ probability of arrest and court actions in 1980 and 2000: The disproportionate impact of “getting tough” on crime. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 13(1), 77-95. doi: 10.1177/1541204013515280

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Trupin, E., & Boesky, L. (1999). Working together for change: Co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders among youth involved in the juvenile justice system: Cross training, juvenile justice, mental health, substance abuse. Delmar, NY: The National GAINS Center.

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Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Darleen Claire Wodzenski, MS ESE, MA CMHC, QPPE, PhD Psychology Candidate - is the founder of Orchard Human Services, Inc. who focuses on the space between learning, developmental, and mental health. An author and national presenter, she specializes in attachment development, drawing upon an extensive background in clinical mental health counseling, exceptional student education, and child and youth development. A Qualified Professional Parent Educator, she also provides training and professional development for educators, juvenile justice professionals, and human services workers.

Keyword Descriptors

Juvenile Justice, Developmental, DMC, Crossover, Habilitation, Trauma-Informed, Developmentally Responsive

Presentation Year

2018

Start Date

3-6-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

3-6-2018 5:30 PM

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Mar 6th, 4:00 PM Mar 6th, 5:30 PM

Developmental Justice

Explore specific factors contribute to the overwhelming and downward spiraling phenomenon of youth involvement with the Juvenile Justice system. Identify Juvenile Justice crossover, DMC (Disproportionate Minority Contact), and trauma-informed and developmentally responsive engagement to promote youth well-being, lawfulness and good citizenship. Identify strategies, protocols, and practices that prevent Juvenile Justice first contact, reduce DMC, and support successful youth re-entry and successful integration into family and community. Includes introduction to critical mental health, habilitative, and sociocutural factors implicated in Juvenile Justice involvement.