First Presenter's Institution

Hope 4 The Wounded, Inc.

Second Presenter's Institution

NA

Third Presenter's Institution

NA

Fourth Presenter's Institution

NA

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Strand #2

Social & Emotional Skills

Relevance

My session predominantly encompasses the themes of Strands I and II. My content puts a heavy emphasis on the need to develop leaders in schools to model the development of a community atmosphere to engage learners and reach the marginalized populations of students. In order to create this relational atmosphere, I discuss the impact of childhood trauma on a student's learning and behaviors. In addition, I cover various material from my books including emotional intelligence, right/left brain integration, the impact of empathy, restorative justice, and alternative discipline strategies.

Brief Program Description

This session will look at ways to encourage wounded students to find academic and life success. By examining the effects of trauma on learning and behavior, I will describe methods for boosting esteem, creating empathetic connections, and cultivating inclusive communities. Other topics discussed will be devising alternative discipline to help students remain in the classroom, increase achievement, and ultimately graduate from high school.

Summary

Based on my firsthand experiences as a teacher and school administratorcombined with my ongoing research, emotional poverty has become a deterrent to academic success. Almost half the nation’s children have experienced at least one or more types of serious childhood trauma, according to a new survey on adverse childhood experiences by the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH), which has a profound impact on their behaviors and/or learning. Educators must have a basic understanding of the social/emotional needs of children of trauma in order to reach them, teach them, and avoid using ineffective strategies and consequences that would only cause further frustration to all parties involved.

The goal of my sessions is to recognize the power of effective leadership and empathy in creating a sense of inclusive community and safety for wounded students. In addition, it's my desire to empower educators with doable strategies and inspiration for redesigning their school environments to direct students on a path to academic and life success. The following are key points I share with audience members:

  • Understanding the Difference between “At-Risk” and “Wounded”

  • The Effects of Trauma on Learning and Behaviors

  • Relationship Building with Wounded Students

  • Developing a Common Team Goal and Mission Statement

  • Keeping the Main Focus Student Achievement

  • Alternative Discipline for Lowering Suspensions/Expulsions

  • Building Social/Emotional Skills for Academic Success

  • The Role of Empathy in Education

  • My Original Model for Reaching Wounded Students: Understanding—Relationship—Reaching The Wounded Student—Hope—Self-Esteem—Teaching—Achievement—Transformation

Evidence

According to a survey on childhood experiences by the National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH), almost half the nation's children have experienced at least one or more types of serious childhood trauma. Traumatic experiences can have a profound, negative impact on a child's learning, behaviors, and relationships, which is why having an understanding of the effects of trauma is imperative for anyone working with youth.

Multiple schools and districts that have implemented programming inspired by my training have reported increases in attendance, improved behaviors, alternative discipline strategies resulting in fewer suspensions, improved academic performance, and increased teacher satisfaction.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Joe Hendershott is establishing a national reputation in his field. Dr. Hendershott possesses a doctorate in Educational Leadership and his masters in Education Administration. He draws on his practical experiences as a teacher and administrator in various educational settings as well as his research to give him a unique and credible vantage point on this topic. Dr. Hendershott has been a teacher in a juvenile corrections facility and a principal at a residential treatment facility, alternative schools, and inner city high schools. His experiences and research also led to the release of two books to date: Reaching the Wounded Student and 7 Ways to Transform the Lives of Wounded Students. Additionally, he has contributed articles to educational journals and online forums. His work has been recognized through several awards including the National Crystal Star Award through the National Dropout Prevention Center/Network at Clemson University, which recognizes outstanding work in the area of dropout prevention and intervention and the Raymond W. Bixler Award from Ashland University, which recognizes excellence in education.

Personally, Dr. Hendershott has been a licensed foster parent and is an adoptive father, which has given him increased motivation and passion for understanding wounded children. All of these experiences combined give audiences a unique lens to view wounded children through and a philosophy for developing doable strategies for reaching the wounded children in their midst.

Keyword Descriptors

Trauma-Informed Practices, Emotional Literacy, Hope, Alternative Discipline

Presentation Year

March 2018

Start Date

3-6-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

3-6-2018 11:30 AM

RTWS PP Long Handout.pdf (78 kB)
Presenter Handout

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Mar 6th, 10:15 AM Mar 6th, 11:30 AM

Reaching the Wounded Student

This session will look at ways to encourage wounded students to find academic and life success. By examining the effects of trauma on learning and behavior, I will describe methods for boosting esteem, creating empathetic connections, and cultivating inclusive communities. Other topics discussed will be devising alternative discipline to help students remain in the classroom, increase achievement, and ultimately graduate from high school.