Title

SPARK: Bad Attitudes Not Bad Kids

First Presenter's Institution

University of West Georgia

Second Presenter's Institution

N/A

Third Presenter's Institution

N/A

Fourth Presenter's Institution

N/A

Fifth Presenter's Institution

N/A

Location

Scarbrough 2

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

N/A

Brief Program Description

Often plagued with problems not of their making, troubled youth find themselves in classrooms where they are quickly labeled as lazy, disruptive, or defiant and quickly erect walls to insulate themselves from what is about to happen. A challenge for even veteran teachers and administrators is how to respond effectively to students whose classroom behavior they find disruptive, disrespectful, irritating, annoying, and a serious threat to classroom etiquette. The SPARK program began with a simple question: What can we do to we solve this problem in our community, inspire defiant youth, and prepare future educators to relate and communicate effectively?

Summary

N/A

Evidence

Presenter will provide.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Thomas Peterson serves as an assistant professor of Cultural and Philosophical Foundations of Education in the College of Education. . He teaches mostly graduate education courses including philosophy, leadership, history, ethics, and culture. His research interests include spirituality in education, teacher renewal, teaching and learning. Prior to his appointment at UWG, Dr. Peterson was a elementary/middle school principal in NC, art teacher in California and Maryland, flight instructor, and pilot missionary to Africa.

Presentation Year

2018

Start Date

3-4-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

3-4-2018 9:45 AM

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Mar 4th, 8:30 AM Mar 4th, 9:45 AM

SPARK: Bad Attitudes Not Bad Kids

Scarbrough 2

Often plagued with problems not of their making, troubled youth find themselves in classrooms where they are quickly labeled as lazy, disruptive, or defiant and quickly erect walls to insulate themselves from what is about to happen. A challenge for even veteran teachers and administrators is how to respond effectively to students whose classroom behavior they find disruptive, disrespectful, irritating, annoying, and a serious threat to classroom etiquette. The SPARK program began with a simple question: What can we do to we solve this problem in our community, inspire defiant youth, and prepare future educators to relate and communicate effectively?