Title

The Educational Rights of Adjudicated Youth

Location

Harborside Center

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

Many people are unaware that when a child is placed in a residential detention facility after adjudication they have a federal right to an adequate education under the Title I, Part D. This paper explores the educational rights maintain by adolescences under court supervision within residential facilities. Through this education, these at-risk students can lower their chances of recidivism.

Brief Program Description

Teachers, administrators, and other service providers are often unaware of the federal education rights of students in residential detention facilities. This paper explores the educational rights maintain by adolescences under court supervision within residential facilities and how to improve that system of education in order to lower rates of recidivism.

Summary

While the school to prison pipeline is well documented and researched (American Psychological Association, 2008; Boccanfuso & Kuhfeld, 2011; Kang-Brown, et al., 2013; Henault, 2005; Martinez, 2009), what happens educationally to these students within a system designed to rehabilitate is less documented and what documentation there is shows that these adjudicated youth are in an educational crisis (Burdick, Feirman, & McInerney, 2011; Tulman & Weck, 2009). “They are more likely than their peers to be absent or truant, face disciplinary action, need evaluation and remedial services, perform below grade level, have a disability that qualifies them for special education services, and drop out of high school” (Burdick, et al., 2011, p. 6). These students are often entering the juvenile justice system from under-resourced educational backgrounds, and are then continuing their pre-existing educational problems and becoming further entrenched in a system that is not meeting their needs (Burdick, et al., 2011) or their state civil right to an adequate education (Feierman, Levick, & Mody, 2010). This paper explores how we as a country have gotten to a point where we are letting down our young people who are in trouble. How are the national and state politics and policies playing into and creating this educational crisis and what can we do about it?

Evidence

The evidence used in this paper is a thorough review of literature, court cases, and federal statutes. By synthesizing these documents a complete picture of the rights of these students is president in a clear and concise manner.

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Helen is a fourth year Ph.D. student in the School of Education at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill systems of education with the juvenile justice system. She currently teaches English Language Arts within a juvenile justice facility in North Carolina. In her free time she enjoys spending time with her daughters, husband, and animals, running, reading, and going to the beach.

Keyword Descriptors

Juvenile Justice, education, federal rights

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

3-8-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

3-8-2016 5:30 PM

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Mar 8th, 4:00 PM Mar 8th, 5:30 PM

The Educational Rights of Adjudicated Youth

Harborside Center

Teachers, administrators, and other service providers are often unaware of the federal education rights of students in residential detention facilities. This paper explores the educational rights maintain by adolescences under court supervision within residential facilities and how to improve that system of education in order to lower rates of recidivism.