Location

Scarbrough 3

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

Knowledge of brain development and gender differences is critical in the ongoing work to close the achievement gaps and promote learning for all youth. New PET scan and MRI technologies reveal structural and functional differences in the brains of boys and girls. With more cortical areas devoted to verbal functioning, sensual memory, sitting still, listening, tonality, and mental cross talk, the complexities of reading and writing come easier to the female brain. Boys lateralize their thinking, need rest states to recharge, and use more cortical areas of their brains for spatial-mechanical functioning. Classrooms that help girls learn will promote gross motor skills, encourage perceptual learning, and use manipulatives to teach math. Boy-friendly classrooms will promote fine motor skills, provide ample space to move around, and make lessons experiential and kinesthetic.

Brief Program Description

This workshop introduces participants to the rapidly emerging research on how the brains of females and males are developmentally, structurally and functionally different. Based on these differences, participants will learn academic approaches customized to the distinctly different learning styles of girls and boys.

Summary

This workshop introduces participants to the rapidly emerging research on how the brains of females and males are developmentally, structurally and functionally different. Based on these differences, participants will learn academic approaches customized to the distinctly different learning styles of girls and boys. With more cortical areas devoted to verbal functioning, sensual memory, sitting still, listening, tonality, and mental cross talk, the complexities of reading and writing come easier to the female brain. Boys lateralize their thinking, need rest states to recharge, and use more cortical areas of their brains for spatial-mechanical functioning. Classrooms that help girls learn will promote gross motor skills, encourage perceptual learning, and use manipulatives to teach math. Boy-friendly classrooms will promote fine motor skills, provide ample space to move around, and make lessons experiential and kinesthetic.

“Jack’s Brain, Jill’s Brain” is presented as an interactive, hands-on workshop that will engage participants in a variety of activities designed to enhance the learning experience. Some of these activities include: 1) viewing and diagnosing brain scans; and 2) changing brain chemistry through movement. This multimedia presentation will incorporate the modalities of music, video, small and large manipulatives, PowerPoint, and movement to fully involve participants in learning.

A. Boys Brains Are Not Girls Brains

1. Developing anatomical differences

2. Developmental differences

3. Functional differences

B. Emotional Differences Influenced by Gender

1. Socialization among peers

2. Relationships with adults

3. Implications for Schools

- Building student-teacher relationships

- Classroom management

- Critical decisions for course content

4. Implications for Out-of-Home Care

- Building student-staff relationships

- Discipline practices

- Fundamental behavioral interventions

C. Practical Applications

1. Powerful practices for enriching the brains of our boys

2. Power practices for enriching the brains of our girls

Evidence

Through a review of the neuroscience research by Jensen and Amen and gender research of Gurian and Eliot, participants will learn how the brains of females and males are developmentally, structurally and functionally different. The practical application of this research is translated to behavioral and emotional interventions with specific focus on helping both sexes improve learning and avoid high risk activities such as drug use, alcohol abuse and sexual activity. Participants will explore some of the differences, because recognizing these differences can help us find solutions to many of the challenges that we experience in the classroom.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Shauna King is a former principal and middle school teacher with 20 years of experience in public and non-public school settings. She is currently an adjunct instructor for LaSalle University and certified presenter for The Upside Down Organization.

In addition to being a highly sought-after presenter, King has worked with adults and children through the National Family Resiliency Center and the Sheppard Pratt Center for Mediation and Educational Programs. Currently, King consults in several school districts in support of their PBIS and school climate initiatives.

King holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Morgan State University and a Master’s degree in Education from Bowie State and Education Specialist degree in Adult Learning from Walden University.

King has a talent and passion for connecting with adults who have chosen to serve children. This passion has opened countless to invitations to work with over 4,000 educators across eight states. An active member of her church, Shauna is a proud wife and mother of two elementary age children, who are the joy of her life.

Keyword Descriptors

brain, gender, male, female, discipline, learning styles, achievement gap

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

3-8-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

3-8-2016 4:00 PM

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Mar 8th, 2:45 PM Mar 8th, 4:00 PM

Jack's Brain, Jill's Brain: Why Gender Differences Matter

Scarbrough 3

This workshop introduces participants to the rapidly emerging research on how the brains of females and males are developmentally, structurally and functionally different. Based on these differences, participants will learn academic approaches customized to the distinctly different learning styles of girls and boys.