Location

Vernon

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

The proposal relates to Strand 1 "Head" as it presents data from a study in which four high school students with disabilities from a Title 1 school were provided a novel intervention that effectively increased their performance on a grade-level math task. The target intervention involved instructional technology (iPads and video technology) and successfully taught an academic task (solving algebraic equations involving the distributive property) outlined by the common core standards to students at risk for academic failure. The results of the study provide implications for practitioners who work with students with disabilities in need of individualized supports on grade-level academic instruction. The targeted intervention could be used across a variety of subjects, age levels, tasks, and could potentially lead to increased academic performance for students with disabilities.

Brief Program Description

This presentation targets a study in which four high school students with disabilities were taught to solve algebraic equations using iPads and video-based instruction. All students showed immediate increases in accurate responding following the introduction of the video-based intervention. This presentation provides practitioners with a flexible technology-based intervention for students with disabilities in need of grade-level academic instruction. The intervention could be used across a variety of subjects and academic tasks.

Summary

The presentation will discuss a study that evaluated the effectiveness of a video-based instructional procedure, point-of-view video prompting delivered via an iPad, in teaching four secondary students with varying disabilities (attention deficit disorder, autism, emotional and behavioral disorder, and/or speech/language impairment) to solve algebraic equations that required use of the distributive property. Participants were taught to independently use video software on an iPad that presented video-models of the steps required to solve the equations. A multiple probe across participants design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. Dependent measures included the percent of steps imitated correctly during the video-prompting instructional sessions, and the percent of equations and steps completed correctly during daily and maintenance probes. All participants learned to accurately solve the targeted algebraic equations following the introduction of the intervention. In addition, participants’ skills generalized to a similar yet untaught equation type. Participants’ skills maintained to varying degrees following treatment. Implications and limitations are discussed.

Evidence

The study used a multiple probe across participants design to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The intervention was staggered across participants (introduced at different points in time) and increased accurate responding on the algebraic tasks was observed only after introduction of the video-based treatment. The study was based on previous research in the area of video-based instruction. Video-based instruction is an evidence-based treatment that has been sufficiently outlined in the literature and can refer to the following subsets: video modeling other, video self-modeling, point-of-view video modeling, or video prompting (Hitchcock et al., 2004; Rayner et al., 2009). The proposed presentation outlines a study that investigated the effectiveness of video-prompting. Prior to this study, video prompting has been used primarily for teaching functional life skills to students with severe/low-incidence disabilities. This study builds off previous research by applying video prompting to academic tasks for students with high-incidence disabilities. The novel application of video prompting proved effective for teaching four students with high incidence disabilities to solve algebraic equations; therefore, the study provides practitioners with a strategy for improving academic performance of students with disabilities and/or at risk for academic failure. The outlined treatment, video prompting, is flexible and could be individualized for individual students and/or across a variety of academic tasks.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Elias Clinton is an assistant professor of Special Education at Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota. His interests include applied behavior analysis, academic/behavior interventions for students with disabilities, assistive technology, and single case research design.

Keyword Descriptors

Video-Based Instruction; Video Prompting; Mobile Technology (iPad); Students with Disabilities; At-Risk Students; Academic Supports; Individualized Intervention

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

3-8-2016 10:15 AM

End Date

3-8-2016 11:30 AM

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Mar 8th, 10:15 AM Mar 8th, 11:30 AM

Using iPads and Video-Based Instruction to Teach Algebra to High School Students with Disabilities

Vernon

This presentation targets a study in which four high school students with disabilities were taught to solve algebraic equations using iPads and video-based instruction. All students showed immediate increases in accurate responding following the introduction of the video-based intervention. This presentation provides practitioners with a flexible technology-based intervention for students with disabilities in need of grade-level academic instruction. The intervention could be used across a variety of subjects and academic tasks.