Title

COUNTERING THE NARRATIVE OF OUT-OF-SCHOOL SUSPENSION THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION MODEL

Location

Ballroom D

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Relevance

This proposal provides qualitative findings from a case study of two alternative learning centers located in the Southeastern region of the United States. Qualitative data, interviews, explored perceptions of centers and their role in students' lives from assistant principals, teachers, and students. Findings revealed centers serve as important spaces for youth to engage in prosocial activity with trained adults, complete academic coursework, improve academic confidence and a future orientation towards graduation. Findings reflect the value of strengthening students' socioemotional skills within the context of alternative learning centers.

Brief Program Description

Lifting up the value of counter stories to out-of-school suspension emphasizes the need to promote school-based interventions designed to address the academic and social needs of students. This presentation focuses on the voice of students, teachers, and assistant principles in describing the relevance of value of alternative learning centers in the lives of youth.

Summary

The 1970s marked a significant shift in the characteristics of suspended students in the United States public education system and created a highly punitive system that more often punished poor, black, and brown students. Since then, economically disadvantaged ethnic minorities comprise about 70% of students suspended from the public education system. The adoption of zero-tolerance policies in the 1990s continued to promote disparities between ethnic minorities and white students. Unfortunately, the narrative has rarely changed in suspension policies—specifically, if you are an ethnic minority and poor you experience suspension at higher rates than white students. A missing voice in this common narrative is the story of success and interventions that counter out-of-school suspension and promote the inclusion and academic success of majority economically disadvantaged ethnic minority students. This presentation will share findings from a case study analysis of two alternative learning centers located in high schools in a school district in the Southeastern region of the United States. Using interviews collected from assistant principals, teachers, and students counter stories to out-of-school suspension create a model of academic success. Coding analysis revealed alternative experiences in centers serve as a transitional period for youth and improve their work ethic, relationships with school adults, and deter perceptions of dropping out of high school. The presenter will present findings and “promising practices” for alternative education targeted towards academically and behaviorally “at-risk” students.

Evidence

  • Findings present several promising practices in alternative education:
  • Smaller learning environments
  • Focus on academic support and positive behavior interventions
  • Family-like atmosphere
  • Strong leadership.
  • 75% of students successfully transitioned from the centers to their traditional classroom environment.

Morrison, G. M., & Allen, M. R. (2007). Promoting student resilience in school contexts. Theory into Practice, 46 (2), 162 – 169.

National Center for Education Statistics. (2012).Suspension and expulsion. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Education website: http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2008/nativetrends/ind_3_2.asp.

NC Department of Public Instruction. (2000). Case Studies of Best Practices: Alternative Program and Schools 1998-1999. Retrieved from http://www.ncpublicschools.org

North Carolina Division of Juvenile Justice (2011). North Carolina Department of Public Safety Division of Juvenile Justice 2011 Annual Report. Retrieved from https://www.ncdps.gov/div/JJ

Roeser, R. W., Eccles, J. S., & Sameroff, A. J. (2000). School as a context for early adolescent’s academic and socio-emotional development: A summary of findings. The Elementary School Journal, 100 (5), 443 – 471;

Scales, P. C., & Taccogna, J. (2001). Developmental assets for success in school and life. Retrieved fromhttp://www.eddigest.com;

Skiba, R.J., Ecker, S. E., & Brown, K. (2009/10). African American disproportionality in school discipline: The divide between best evidence and legal remedy. New York School Law Review, 54, 1071 - 1112. Retrieved fromhttp://www.indiana.edu/~equity/docs/Skiba%20et%20al%2054%204.pdf;

Terriquez, V., Chlala, R., & Sacha, J. (2013). The impact of punitive high school discipline policies on the postsecondary trajectories of young men. Research brief retrieved from http://pathways.gseis.ucla.edu/publications/Discipline_Report.pdf

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Dawn X. Henderson is a Community Psychologist and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences at Winston-Salem State University. Her research, quite broadly, focuses on resilience and, specifically, examines community- and school-based interventions in promoting inclusion and educational attainment among suspended youth.

Keyword Descriptors

alternative education, ethnic minorities, school suspension, economically disadvantaged, gradutio

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

3-7-2016 3:00 PM

End Date

3-7-2016 4:15 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 7th, 3:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:15 PM

COUNTERING THE NARRATIVE OF OUT-OF-SCHOOL SUSPENSION THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION MODEL

Ballroom D

Lifting up the value of counter stories to out-of-school suspension emphasizes the need to promote school-based interventions designed to address the academic and social needs of students. This presentation focuses on the voice of students, teachers, and assistant principles in describing the relevance of value of alternative learning centers in the lives of youth.