Title

Monitoring Educational Outcomes of Youth at Risk: A Practical Guide to Single Case and Small N Intervention Design

Location

Percival

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Strand #2

Mental & Physical Health

Relevance

Evidently, three out of five conference strands concern about educational outcomes of youth at risk (i.e., academic achievement, social and emotional skills, and mental and physical health). Youth at risk requires personalized treatments (interventions), and many promising treatments are available to professionals interested in the well-being of youth. However, can professionals (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors, and social workers) without strong statistical background discern (analyze) treatment effects meaningfully? This presentation provides a “take home” learning opportunity for participants to become knowledgeable about an effective (and relatively new) analytical technique often referred to as “single case design” or “small N design” that will allow professionals to effectively design their own monitoring systems to track the progression of youth at risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment program that they have adopted.

Brief Program Description

This presentation aims to introduce an effective (and relatively new) analytical technique often referred to as “single case design” or “small N design” that allows professionals to design their own monitoring systems to track the progression of youth at risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment that they adopt. Audience can be any group of professionals (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors, and social workers).

Summary

It is evident that three out of five conference strands concern about educational outcomes of youth at risk (i.e., academic achievement, social and emotional skills, and mental and physical health). Fortunately, credible instruments exist to measure these educational outcomes both longitudinally and in a cross-sectional manner. To improve these educational outcomes of youth at risk, personalized treatments (interventions) are usually required. Many promising treatments are available to professionals who are interested in the well-being of youth at risk. As soon as these professionals adopt a treatment, at least two issues immediately surface. One is how to keep track of the progression of youth at risk in those educational outcomes under the treatment, and the other is how to discern the effectiveness of the treatment after a period of implementation. Can professionals (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors, and social workers) without strong statistical background meaningfully monitor (track) individual progression and discern (analyze) treatment effects? This presentation provides a “take home” learning opportunity for participants to become knowledgeable about an effective (and relatively new) analytical technique often referred to as “single case design” or “small N design” that will allow professionals to effectively design their own monitoring systems to track the progression of youth at risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment program that they have adopted. This presentation will introduce the basic working principles of this analytical technique with examples from real-world applications (i.e., research studies). Topics will include design, implementation, monitoring, and analysis, all presented in practical and easy-to-apply terms for professionals without strong statistical background. Professionals will be able to apply this technique once back home and use the results to adjust, improve, and change treatment options for the optimal improvement of youth at risk in academic achievement, social and emotional skills, and mental and physical health.

Evidence

“Single case design” or “small N design” is based on matured (proven) statistical theories that have been increasingly applied to monitoring individual progression and evaluating program effectiveness. Meanwhile, this technique does not require any statistical testing, thus making it easy for anyone to learn and apply immediately. The graphing approach to present the analytical results also makes it easy for professionals to communicate with other professionals and stakeholders (e.g., parents) about the progression of youth at risk.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Xin Ma is Professor of Education Statistics in the Department of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology, University of Kentucky. He is Spencer Fellow of the (U.S.) National Academy of Education and (former) Canada Research Chair. His areas of specialization are advanced statistical (quantitative) methods; advanced analysis of local, state, national, and international surveys, program evaluation and policy analysis, and school effectiveness and improvement. As a statistician, he works to advance quantitative research, using latest statistical theories and models to improve and enhance quantitative analysis.

Keyword Descriptors

Educational Outcomes, Monitoring Progress, Treatment Effects, Single Case Design, Small N Design

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

3-7-2016 3:00 PM

End Date

3-7-2016 4:15 PM

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Mar 7th, 3:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:15 PM

Monitoring Educational Outcomes of Youth at Risk: A Practical Guide to Single Case and Small N Intervention Design

Percival

This presentation aims to introduce an effective (and relatively new) analytical technique often referred to as “single case design” or “small N design” that allows professionals to design their own monitoring systems to track the progression of youth at risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment that they adopt. Audience can be any group of professionals (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors, and social workers).