Title

Raising The Bar For Classroom Behavior and School Success

Location

Harborside Center East and West

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Strand #2

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

A focused and engaged learner is positioned to succeed academically. A distracted disruptive learner undermines teaching and learning for all involved. This means that connecting with learners and teaching behavioral expectations is as important as teaching academics.

Brief Program Description

Despite the diverse learning culture in which we work, all children can learn when they are systematically taught and when we continuously communicate our BELIEF in their excellence.

K-12 participants will recognize effective ways to shape appropriate behavior and sustain high expectations for every child’s classroom performance and school success. Raise the bar and be ready to see great results.

Summary

The social and emotional skills that drive student behavior are a critical factor in addressing disciplinary challenges. But behavioral skills, just like any other skills, are learned and must be taught. When teachers fail to understand that, assuming that all children will arrive at school socialized, ready and willing to learn, problem behavior can begin to germinate. This can sometimes cause competent teachers to lose faith in the child who presents challenges as well as in their own confidence as classroom managers. The interactions that we forge with children are the key to engaging them socially, emotionally and academically. We will examine the importance of knowing how to make our interactions positive and powerful. The ways in which we communicate and the establishment of consistent routines greatly impacts teacher efficacy and learner success and productivity. Routines and procedures reinforce the skills that every student must have in order to be a successful learner. Therefore, teaching and practicing crucial classroom routines is just as important as teaching and practicing academic content. These competencies should be approached in the same way that academic content is approached. In this session, appropriate for PK-12 teachers and teacher leaders, we will discuss a powerful framework for “teach-to” lesson plans that incorporates goals, rationales and procedures. When behavioral expectations are not clear and follow through is inconsistent, the behavioral climate in the classroom quickly erodes. Rules and routines are what allow a teacher to be a fair disciplinarian and to be consistent in the expectations extended toward every child.

Evidence

Spending extended time with educators, parents and even students provides ample evidence of the gradual, yet persistent decline in the behavioral climate in schools. However, one doesn’t have to look far to find plenty of supporting evidence. In a recent teacher attrition survey conducted by the National Education Association, it was reported that teacher turnover currently ranges from 17 to 20 percent nationally. However the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future estimate that one-third of all new teachers leave after three years and 46 percent are gone within five years. Burned out teachers cite discipline problems and lack of administrative support as two of the main reasons for their departure (Why They Leave. NEA Today, 2013). The nationwide poll conducted by Public Agenda several years ago gained national attention and its findings remain relevant today. The study found that the problem of student discipline and rampant misbehavior is a pervasive one that extends to schools across the country, regardless of demographics. More than 3 in 4 teachers acknowledge that, “if it weren’t for discipline problems, I could be teaching a lot more effectively.” The study entitled “Teaching Interrupted” contends that student discipline is a universal concern to teachers and parents. It undermines public education, holds learning hostage in the classroom and affects both teacher morale and student learning (Teaching Interrupted: Do Discipline Policies in Today’s Public Schools Foster the Common Good?. Public Agenda 2004).

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Cheryl Smith Turner is a seasoned teacher trainer who brings passion, professionalism and more than 35 years of experience in the field of education to each and every presentation she does. Cheryl possesses a training style that integrates her ability to read and connect with an audience with humor and “hands-on/minds-on” learning. As an Asst. Project Director and Lead Trainer for the Georgia State University Best Practices Training Initiative, Cheryl worked collaboratively with the Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning (Bright from the Start) in developing and providing professional development for Georgia Pre-K teachers, site directors and other education practitioners. She conducted professional development workshops and one to two-day trainings on a variety of topics and areas of content, to include classroom management, social-emotional development, language and literacy development, critical thinking skills and play based learning. Currently, Cheryl is a nationally certified trainer for classroom management and differentiated instruction as well as a Georgia State approved trainer for Strengthening Families Georgia. Additionally, Cheryl is CEO/president of her own educational consulting company.

Keyword Descriptors

Classroom Management, Social-Emotional Skills, Classroom Climate, Teaching to Expectations, Communication Skills, Positive Discipline

Presentation Year

2015

Start Date

3-3-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

3-3-2015 5:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 3rd, 4:00 PM Mar 3rd, 5:30 PM

Raising The Bar For Classroom Behavior and School Success

Harborside Center East and West

Despite the diverse learning culture in which we work, all children can learn when they are systematically taught and when we continuously communicate our BELIEF in their excellence.

K-12 participants will recognize effective ways to shape appropriate behavior and sustain high expectations for every child’s classroom performance and school success. Raise the bar and be ready to see great results.