Title

Jet Engine Emissions and Vapor Contrail Reduction through Increased Combustion Efficiency with the Aim to Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect and the Emission of Greenhouse Gases

Location

Additional Presentations- Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Computing

Document Type and Release Option

Thesis Presentation (Restricted to Georgia Southern)

Faculty Mentor

Valentin Soloiu

Faculty Mentor Email

vsoloiu@georgiasouthern.edu

Presentation Year

2021

Start Date

26-4-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2021 12:00 AM

Keywords

Emissions, Greenhouse gases, Combustion efficiency, Jet engines

Description

As society continues to globalize and advance in complexity, the increased demand for the business aviation has caused the travel rate of airlines globally to increase with each year. With this continual increase in aviation travel, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) predicts that the fuel consumption rate is to increase by 1.6 percent as of the year 2025. While this increase in fuel consumption is a positive trait of a thriving aviation community, concerns also arise regarding increased greenhouse gas emissions and enlarged contributions to the global greenhouse effect. The most destructive greenhouse gasses associated with jet engine emissions are carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, water vapor (which is a key aspect to contrail formation), and small carbon soot particulates. A solution to this growing issue is the use of synthetic fuels as an alternative to traditional fossil fuels seeing that synthetic fuels have a much cleaner carbon footprint. The research performed in this paper will focus on the Noise, Vibrations, and Harshness (NVH) studies paired with the emissions analysis of synthetic fuels along an turbo jet engine. The efficiency analysis of the synthetic fuels used in this research will be completed through the application of high precision measurement microphones, accelerometers, and emissions analyzers which are able to detect the sounds, vibrations, and levels of greenhouse gasses output by the jet engine.

Academic Unit

Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Computing

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

Jet Engine Emissions and Vapor Contrail Reduction through Increased Combustion Efficiency with the Aim to Mitigate the Greenhouse Effect and the Emission of Greenhouse Gases

Additional Presentations- Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Computing

As society continues to globalize and advance in complexity, the increased demand for the business aviation has caused the travel rate of airlines globally to increase with each year. With this continual increase in aviation travel, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) predicts that the fuel consumption rate is to increase by 1.6 percent as of the year 2025. While this increase in fuel consumption is a positive trait of a thriving aviation community, concerns also arise regarding increased greenhouse gas emissions and enlarged contributions to the global greenhouse effect. The most destructive greenhouse gasses associated with jet engine emissions are carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, water vapor (which is a key aspect to contrail formation), and small carbon soot particulates. A solution to this growing issue is the use of synthetic fuels as an alternative to traditional fossil fuels seeing that synthetic fuels have a much cleaner carbon footprint. The research performed in this paper will focus on the Noise, Vibrations, and Harshness (NVH) studies paired with the emissions analysis of synthetic fuels along an turbo jet engine. The efficiency analysis of the synthetic fuels used in this research will be completed through the application of high precision measurement microphones, accelerometers, and emissions analyzers which are able to detect the sounds, vibrations, and levels of greenhouse gasses output by the jet engine.