Proposal Title

Stress, College & Physical Activity: Does One Affect the Other?

Primary Faculty Mentor’s Name

Dr. Helen Bland

Proposal Track

Student

Session Format

Poster

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether college students’ level of physical activity impacted their level of stress. The researchers hypothesized that the relationship between one’s level of physical activity and stress would be inversely related. The research design used was a quantitative, quasi-experimental, cross-sectional study measured by a 19-question survey on the behaviors of students attending a Southeast Georgia university (n=134). In this study the participants were selected from a non-probability, sample of convenience. Descriptive and inferential statistics reported means and significant differences. Data analysis showed 90.4% of the participants workout between 0-220 minutes a day and another 8.0% of the participants reported working out 221-440 minutes a day. Most participants (61.2%) reported working out only 2-3 days per week. Overall mean stress level was 38.92, indicating a high level of reported stress. Reported levels of physical activity did not impact levels of stress (p>0.05). Participants perceived level of stress significantly impacted their actual levels of stress (p

Keywords

Stress, College students, Physical activity

Location

Concourse/Atrium

Presentation Year

2014

Start Date

11-15-2014 9:40 AM

End Date

11-15-2014 10:55 AM

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 15th, 9:40 AM Nov 15th, 10:55 AM

Stress, College & Physical Activity: Does One Affect the Other?

Concourse/Atrium

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether college students’ level of physical activity impacted their level of stress. The researchers hypothesized that the relationship between one’s level of physical activity and stress would be inversely related. The research design used was a quantitative, quasi-experimental, cross-sectional study measured by a 19-question survey on the behaviors of students attending a Southeast Georgia university (n=134). In this study the participants were selected from a non-probability, sample of convenience. Descriptive and inferential statistics reported means and significant differences. Data analysis showed 90.4% of the participants workout between 0-220 minutes a day and another 8.0% of the participants reported working out 221-440 minutes a day. Most participants (61.2%) reported working out only 2-3 days per week. Overall mean stress level was 38.92, indicating a high level of reported stress. Reported levels of physical activity did not impact levels of stress (p>0.05). Participants perceived level of stress significantly impacted their actual levels of stress (p