Presentation Title

Can't versus won't: A simulation that illustrates the importance of using differential diagnosis to determine functions of behaviors as they relate to academic deficits and disabilities

Presentation Abstract

In order for students to exhibit positive behaviors, they must have the tools and supports to access curriculum, assessments, and materials. If students are experiencing academic deficiencies or have disabilities that marginalize them from a learning environment, they will engage in escape and avoidance behavior. In other words, educators must distinguish between students who "can't" from students who "won't." This presentation will include a simulation that allows its participants to experience what it is like to not be able to perform simple, everyday tasks such as writing, speaking, and reading. Direct connections to behaviors will be made and corresponding, potential positive supports will be provided. This aligns well with empowering both children and teachers.

Conference Program Description

Interfering behaviors often occur when students are unable to access curriculum, materials, or assessments due to academic deficiencies or disabilities. This session will simulate these deficiencies and allow participants to explore the behaviors that often go along them. Distinguishing between "can't" and "won't" will be discussed, and positive supports for both will be presented.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Can't versus won't: A simulation that illustrates the importance of using differential diagnosis to determine functions of behaviors as they relate to academic deficits and disabilities

In order for students to exhibit positive behaviors, they must have the tools and supports to access curriculum, assessments, and materials. If students are experiencing academic deficiencies or have disabilities that marginalize them from a learning environment, they will engage in escape and avoidance behavior. In other words, educators must distinguish between students who "can't" from students who "won't." This presentation will include a simulation that allows its participants to experience what it is like to not be able to perform simple, everyday tasks such as writing, speaking, and reading. Direct connections to behaviors will be made and corresponding, potential positive supports will be provided. This aligns well with empowering both children and teachers.