Presentation Title

Efficacy of PBIS Implementation Status on Student Suicidality

Highest Degree of Primary Presenter

Specialist Degree

Presentation Abstract

The current study aims to answer the question: Do PBIS implementation status and levels of fidelity impact rates of student suicidality? Results from this study can help inform researchers and practitioners about the efficacy of PBIS, the importance of improving school climate, and the role school psychologists can have in implementing PBIS while collecting and analyzing outcome data. The current study uses data 22,640 racially and ethnically diverse middle and high school students from 24 schools, across three school districts in one Southeastern state. Most schools were in the process of implementing PBIS. Data about PBIS implementation status was collected as part of a wider statewide initiative focused on student mental health and PBIS implementation fidelity. Schools were categorized as Non-PBIS, Installing, Emerging, or Operational, with Installing schools being those that have spent the least amount of time implementing PBIS, and Emerging and Operational schools being those that have spent increasingly more time implementing PBIS and have shown trends in improvement in terms of increased implementation fidelity and decreased numbers of office disciplinary referrals and in- and out-of-school suspensions. Data about implementation fidelity was collected via the Benchmarks of Quality. Information about bullying and school climate were collected via the 2016-2107 administration of the Georgia Student Health Survey, Second Edition. A Generalized Logistic Hierarchical Linear Model was estimated regressing suicidality on demographic variables, PBIS implementation status, and school climate.

This research directly addresses mental health wellness, by examining PBIS implementation status on student suicidality. Information from this presentation can inform stakeholders at all levels, including parents and community members, about risk factors and protective factors for student suicidality.

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Efficacy of PBIS Implementation Status on Student Suicidality

The current study aims to answer the question: Do PBIS implementation status and levels of fidelity impact rates of student suicidality? Results from this study can help inform researchers and practitioners about the efficacy of PBIS, the importance of improving school climate, and the role school psychologists can have in implementing PBIS while collecting and analyzing outcome data. The current study uses data 22,640 racially and ethnically diverse middle and high school students from 24 schools, across three school districts in one Southeastern state. Most schools were in the process of implementing PBIS. Data about PBIS implementation status was collected as part of a wider statewide initiative focused on student mental health and PBIS implementation fidelity. Schools were categorized as Non-PBIS, Installing, Emerging, or Operational, with Installing schools being those that have spent the least amount of time implementing PBIS, and Emerging and Operational schools being those that have spent increasingly more time implementing PBIS and have shown trends in improvement in terms of increased implementation fidelity and decreased numbers of office disciplinary referrals and in- and out-of-school suspensions. Data about implementation fidelity was collected via the Benchmarks of Quality. Information about bullying and school climate were collected via the 2016-2107 administration of the Georgia Student Health Survey, Second Edition. A Generalized Logistic Hierarchical Linear Model was estimated regressing suicidality on demographic variables, PBIS implementation status, and school climate.

This research directly addresses mental health wellness, by examining PBIS implementation status on student suicidality. Information from this presentation can inform stakeholders at all levels, including parents and community members, about risk factors and protective factors for student suicidality.