Presentation Title

Physical literacy and information literacy as mixed terrain: possibilities for academic libraries

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation

Conference Strand

Critical Literacy

Target Audience

Higher Education

Second Target Audience

K-12

Location

Session 2

Relevance

This proposal critically examines information literacy and the psychomotor domain, and also seeks to understand other types of literacies used by students, faculty and practitioners. This is about social aspects of information and knowledge, as well as the creation of information.

Abstract

This paper is a pilot exploration of the parallels between physical literacy and information literacy, with a focus on the idea of hybrid literacies. As a concept, the idea of physical literacy predates information literacy, and at present is exploding in both the scholarly conversation and spaces of applied health policy. However, sports-related studies often seem absent from academia in general, and library scholarship is often confounded by the psychomotor domain of Bloom’s taxonomy. Research by Tim Gorichanaz and others queries conventional understandings of information; many current high-impact approaches to pedagogy and research emphasize other ways of knowing, but do not always clearly link these experiences to either information or physical literacy. These two approaches suggest a space where hybrid literacies can exchange fluently.This paper seeks to understand the current scholarship and directions on physical literacy, and its potential connections to information literacy as understood in academic libraries. Through short form interviews with scholars, practitioners, and athletes, this research asks where in the ACRL Framework physical literacy already exists or can find a toehold. This study is meant to be relevant for librarians who work with faculty and students in programs such as kinesiology or exercise physiology, as well as those who may be pondering the hybrid spaces created by embodied knowledge.

Presentation Description

This paper is a pilot exploration of the parallels between physical literacy and information literacy. Seeking to understand the current scholarship and directions on physical literacy, interviews by scholars, athletes and practitioners will illustrate meaningful concepts and help draw parallels to the ACRL Framework. The research is relevant for librarians who work with faculty and students in programs such as kinesiology or exercise physiology, as well as those interested in embodied knowledge, forms of information, and different ways of knowing.

Keywords

physical literacy, information literacy, psychomotor domain, embodied knowledge, information, information literacy, interviews, athletes

Publication Type and Release Option

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Mar 31st, 1:00 PM Mar 31st, 2:00 PM

Physical literacy and information literacy as mixed terrain: possibilities for academic libraries

Session 2

This paper is a pilot exploration of the parallels between physical literacy and information literacy, with a focus on the idea of hybrid literacies. As a concept, the idea of physical literacy predates information literacy, and at present is exploding in both the scholarly conversation and spaces of applied health policy. However, sports-related studies often seem absent from academia in general, and library scholarship is often confounded by the psychomotor domain of Bloom’s taxonomy. Research by Tim Gorichanaz and others queries conventional understandings of information; many current high-impact approaches to pedagogy and research emphasize other ways of knowing, but do not always clearly link these experiences to either information or physical literacy. These two approaches suggest a space where hybrid literacies can exchange fluently.This paper seeks to understand the current scholarship and directions on physical literacy, and its potential connections to information literacy as understood in academic libraries. Through short form interviews with scholars, practitioners, and athletes, this research asks where in the ACRL Framework physical literacy already exists or can find a toehold. This study is meant to be relevant for librarians who work with faculty and students in programs such as kinesiology or exercise physiology, as well as those who may be pondering the hybrid spaces created by embodied knowledge.