Location

Poster Session

Type of Presentation

Poster Session

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

This study employs webometric content analysis to assess the navigability of the state of Georgia's four-year public, academic libraries. The research questions focus on the frequency of the academic library link's appearance on the university homepage, the navigational paths to crucial content on library websites, and the degree to which responsive design was integrated into the academic library websites. The study finds that the library link was located on the university's homepage 8 out of the 17 (47%) websites selected. 8 out of 17 (47%) library homepages were accessible with only one click or link. 2 out of 17 (11.7%) library homepages were accessible with three or more clicks or links. The average number of clicks or links to schedule a research consultation was three clicks or links. Pertaining to responsive design, 5 out of 17 (29%) library websites included a calendar integrated into scheduling. The author concludes that academic libraries should consider accessibility and responsive design during this Post COVID-19 era when reorganizing their websites. With the increasing amount of digital information, a library's homepage exists as the first point of access for patrons to information literacy and much more. Library websites' framework should provide immediate context so that patrons are aware of their location while on sites. The design should then balance utility and direct access to make for a clear and helpful online library experience. This study seeks to determine how such content is organized, presenting a navigation pattern for academic libraries to consider, and possibly follow.

Presentation Description

The best way to teach and inform patrons on information literacy is the first to be accessible. This study will look at Georgia's public universities and the navigability of reaching the library link, how many clicks to reach the library home page, and how many clicks or links to schedule a research consultation. The age of virtual education is growing, and so must the attention to the accessibility of discovery and assistance on our academic libraries' websites.

Session Objectives

To inform on and highlight consistencies that others may consider and possibly use to better their own websites.

To emphasize the need of clear and direct information access during this time of growth in digital information.

Would you be willing to serve as a Session Moderator?

NO

Keywords

Academic Libraries, Navigability, Research Assistance, Responsive Design, Georgia

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 4:15 PM Mar 26th, 5:15 PM

Accessibility to Research Assistance in Georgia Four-Year Public Academic Libraries

Poster Session

This study employs webometric content analysis to assess the navigability of the state of Georgia's four-year public, academic libraries. The research questions focus on the frequency of the academic library link's appearance on the university homepage, the navigational paths to crucial content on library websites, and the degree to which responsive design was integrated into the academic library websites. The study finds that the library link was located on the university's homepage 8 out of the 17 (47%) websites selected. 8 out of 17 (47%) library homepages were accessible with only one click or link. 2 out of 17 (11.7%) library homepages were accessible with three or more clicks or links. The average number of clicks or links to schedule a research consultation was three clicks or links. Pertaining to responsive design, 5 out of 17 (29%) library websites included a calendar integrated into scheduling. The author concludes that academic libraries should consider accessibility and responsive design during this Post COVID-19 era when reorganizing their websites. With the increasing amount of digital information, a library's homepage exists as the first point of access for patrons to information literacy and much more. Library websites' framework should provide immediate context so that patrons are aware of their location while on sites. The design should then balance utility and direct access to make for a clear and helpful online library experience. This study seeks to determine how such content is organized, presenting a navigation pattern for academic libraries to consider, and possibly follow.