Presentation Title

Expanding the Scope of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education: Scholarship Analysis and Practice Recommendations

Location

Session Seven Breakouts

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

In recent years, librarianship as a field has seen a shift in the analysis of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework from an initial focus on information search, retrieval, and use skills per se to a broader impact of the Framework as a transformative, interdisciplinary teaching tool applicable to the entire higher education domain.

The extent of this impact on the twenty-first century information seeker has yet to be understood. This presentation will highlight the findings of a meta-analysis of contemporary scholarship exploring the sociocultural dimensions of information literacy education. The session will delve into how learners’ “funds of knowledge,” i.e., their unique identities shaped by family, social, or cultural backgrounds, may affect their mastery of vital literacy skills.

The intersectionality inherent in literacy education will be further explained through the practical lens, drawing on the successful experience of blending the tenets of the ACRL Framework and the Building Blocks to Cultural Competence in the course of a one-shot library instruction for nontraditional students. Implications of expanding our understanding of the scope and applicability of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework beyond librarianship and onto multiple cognate areas of praxis will also be discussed.

Presentation Description

This session focuses on the findings of a meta-analysis of contemporary scholarship exploring the sociocultural dimensions of information literacy education. It explores the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education as a transformative, interdisciplinary teaching tool applicable to the entire higher education domain. The intersectionality inherent in literacy education is further explained through the practical lens, drawing on the successful experience of blending the six Frames and Building Blocks to Cultural Competence during library instruction for underrepresented students.

Session Objectives

The audience will:

1) Develop an understanding of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education as a transformative, interdisciplinary teaching tool applicable to the entire higher education domain.

2) Learn best practices to collaborate with colleagues to design and teach information literacy sessions to diverse groups of learners, including marginalized and underserved students.

3) Generate instruction ideas to blend teaching of the threshold concepts of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education with sociocultural literacy education.

Would you be willing to serve as a Session Moderator?

NO

Keywords

Information literacy, marginalized populations, twenty-first century learning

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 3:45 PM Mar 26th, 4:15 PM

Expanding the Scope of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education: Scholarship Analysis and Practice Recommendations

Session Seven Breakouts

In recent years, librarianship as a field has seen a shift in the analysis of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework from an initial focus on information search, retrieval, and use skills per se to a broader impact of the Framework as a transformative, interdisciplinary teaching tool applicable to the entire higher education domain.

The extent of this impact on the twenty-first century information seeker has yet to be understood. This presentation will highlight the findings of a meta-analysis of contemporary scholarship exploring the sociocultural dimensions of information literacy education. The session will delve into how learners’ “funds of knowledge,” i.e., their unique identities shaped by family, social, or cultural backgrounds, may affect their mastery of vital literacy skills.

The intersectionality inherent in literacy education will be further explained through the practical lens, drawing on the successful experience of blending the tenets of the ACRL Framework and the Building Blocks to Cultural Competence in the course of a one-shot library instruction for nontraditional students. Implications of expanding our understanding of the scope and applicability of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework beyond librarianship and onto multiple cognate areas of praxis will also be discussed.