Location

Session Five Breakouts

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

In Spring and Summer 2020 librarians at a mid-size university created online information literacy course modules with auto-graded content. These digital learning objects were designed to be used as graded content within courses across disciplines. In Fall 2020, the first iteration of the online course was piloted in several courses ranging from second-year undergraduates to first-year graduate students. One of the courses that participated in the pilot was a graduate-level course in the media specialist program. These students used the information literacy course both as a way to learn how to use the library and as a learning object for them to critique. In this presentation, the librarian who designed the course will co-present with the professor of the media specialist course and a graduate student test-driver. The librarian will show the course and briefly explain how it was designed. The professor of the media specialist course will discuss how it was integrated into the graduate-level course and give an overview of student feedback. The graduate student will focus on their experiences with the course both as a means to help them learn how to use the library and as a model for a learning object they might want to adapt for use in a PK-12 school library media center. Session attendees will also learn about next steps in the evolution of the course modules and how they can access the content to modify for their own institutions.

Presentation Description

In Fall 2020 a mid-sized university library piloted online information literacy modules in their course management system (CMS). This presentation features the librarian who created the course and a professor whose course participated in the pilot. Session attendees will also hear from a graduate student who participated in the pilot as a requirement for a course in their School Library Media program. Attendees will learn how they can access the content to upload into their own CMS.

Session Objectives

Participants will be able to identify strengths and weaknesses of an online information literacy course.

Participants will be able to evaluate how to adapt online learning modules for their own institutional settings.

Would you be willing to serve as a Session Moderator?

YES

Keywords

online learning object; media specialist; academic library; asynchronous instruction; remote learning

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 2:15 PM Mar 26th, 2:45 PM

Test-driving the pilot: experiences creating and using a digital information literacy course

Session Five Breakouts

In Spring and Summer 2020 librarians at a mid-size university created online information literacy course modules with auto-graded content. These digital learning objects were designed to be used as graded content within courses across disciplines. In Fall 2020, the first iteration of the online course was piloted in several courses ranging from second-year undergraduates to first-year graduate students. One of the courses that participated in the pilot was a graduate-level course in the media specialist program. These students used the information literacy course both as a way to learn how to use the library and as a learning object for them to critique. In this presentation, the librarian who designed the course will co-present with the professor of the media specialist course and a graduate student test-driver. The librarian will show the course and briefly explain how it was designed. The professor of the media specialist course will discuss how it was integrated into the graduate-level course and give an overview of student feedback. The graduate student will focus on their experiences with the course both as a means to help them learn how to use the library and as a model for a learning object they might want to adapt for use in a PK-12 school library media center. Session attendees will also learn about next steps in the evolution of the course modules and how they can access the content to modify for their own institutions.