Presentation Title

Critical Inquiry via Annotated Bibliographies: Transitioning to University-Level Research

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation

Target Audience

Higher Education

Location

Session Five Breakouts

Abstract

Content:

After a brief introduction of our assignment, the first presenter will take the participants through our newly-revised library tutorial, discussing ways that it is designed to help students take advantage of the university resources. Then the second presenter will model a revision workshop, with audience participation, designed to help students move deeper in their engagement with their sources. Finally, we will share the assignment rubric and the results of our accreditation assessment.

Currency:

In our university’s most recent accreditation review, one of the program objectives we evaluated was student demonstration of “using writing as a means of critical inquiry.” Instructors in our program wanted to know how they could better help the students with this criteria since did not seem as straight forward as other criteria. This panel is developed out of that ongoing discussion and we believe that other writing educators would be interested in participating in it.

Purpose:

We envision our panel session as a useful conversation among high school teachers, two-year college faculty, and four-year college faculty about how a pedagogical workhorse like the annotated bibliography assignment can be revised and refreshed to better help students synthesize the sources they find to make meaning.

Support:

For this project we draw on both library studies and principles of assessment outlined by the National Conference on College Composition and Communication. Specifically we use Jean Donham and Mariah Steele, “Instructional Interventions Across the Inquiry Process,” College and Undergraduate Libraries, vol. 14, no. 4, 2007, pp. 3-18, and Anne Marie Gruber, Mary Anne Knefel, and Paul Waelchi, “Modeling Scholarly Inquiry: One Article at a Time” College and Undergraduate Libraries, vol. 15, no. 1-2, 2008, pp. 99-125. We also use Kathryn E. Joyce, “Meeting Our Standards for Educational Justice: Doing Our Best with the Evidence,” Theory and Research in Education, vol. 16, no. 1, 2018, pp. 3-22.

Presentation Description

We consider how to help students use writing as a means of critical inquiry as they move from “cherry-picking” evidence to engaging more fully with their research sources. We will present our Annotated Bibliography assignment and model key aspects of our pedagogy in both first-year composition classes and in our upper-division course required of transfer students.

Would you be willing to serve as a Session Moderator?

YES

Keywords

critical inquiry, student research, information literacy, annotated bibliography

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 2:15 PM Mar 26th, 2:45 PM

Critical Inquiry via Annotated Bibliographies: Transitioning to University-Level Research

Session Five Breakouts

Content:

After a brief introduction of our assignment, the first presenter will take the participants through our newly-revised library tutorial, discussing ways that it is designed to help students take advantage of the university resources. Then the second presenter will model a revision workshop, with audience participation, designed to help students move deeper in their engagement with their sources. Finally, we will share the assignment rubric and the results of our accreditation assessment.

Currency:

In our university’s most recent accreditation review, one of the program objectives we evaluated was student demonstration of “using writing as a means of critical inquiry.” Instructors in our program wanted to know how they could better help the students with this criteria since did not seem as straight forward as other criteria. This panel is developed out of that ongoing discussion and we believe that other writing educators would be interested in participating in it.

Purpose:

We envision our panel session as a useful conversation among high school teachers, two-year college faculty, and four-year college faculty about how a pedagogical workhorse like the annotated bibliography assignment can be revised and refreshed to better help students synthesize the sources they find to make meaning.

Support:

For this project we draw on both library studies and principles of assessment outlined by the National Conference on College Composition and Communication. Specifically we use Jean Donham and Mariah Steele, “Instructional Interventions Across the Inquiry Process,” College and Undergraduate Libraries, vol. 14, no. 4, 2007, pp. 3-18, and Anne Marie Gruber, Mary Anne Knefel, and Paul Waelchi, “Modeling Scholarly Inquiry: One Article at a Time” College and Undergraduate Libraries, vol. 15, no. 1-2, 2008, pp. 99-125. We also use Kathryn E. Joyce, “Meeting Our Standards for Educational Justice: Doing Our Best with the Evidence,” Theory and Research in Education, vol. 16, no. 1, 2018, pp. 3-22.