Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation

Target Audience

Higher Education

Location

Session Four Breakouts

Abstract

At Idaho State University the general education program includes an information literacy objective. Students complete courses that fulfill an information-literacy requirement. The library’s three-credit course has been taught since 2013. This presentation outlines how a community of student engagement has been fostered in this course by the presenter. The presentation will include ideas on how to create active learning that focuses on information-literacy development and discussion, including formative assessment, classroom assessment techniques, and effective communication with students.

Specifically, this presentation will report on the efforts to engage students with knowledge surveys, Quizizz/Kahoot! quizzes, breakout room discussions, and interrupted lectures in a hybrid face-to-face/Zoom setting.. The first two minutes of any class is the most important time. Therefore, it is important to avoid logistical matters and dive directly into the most important learning for the day. Come prepared to discuss how to involve your students in a more effective manner that increases learning and motivation.

Typically, classrooms include a lot of back and forth between the instructor and the students. Community engagement means that students freely share their opinions and ideas in a way that helps everyone, including the instructor, to learn. Community engagement means that we care about our students and they feel safe to share their ideas and opinions. Evidence of community engagement in the classroom may be seen when students help each other and teach each other, so there is horizontal communication among students and not just vertical communication from the instructor to the students.

Presentation Description

This presentation outlines how a community of student engagement has been fostered in this course by the presenter. The presentation will include ideas on how to create active learning that focuses on information-literacy development and discussion, including formative assessment, classroom assessment techniques, and effective communication with students. Specifically, this presentation will report on the efforts to engage students with knowledge surveys, Quizizz/Kahoot! quizzes, breakout room discussions, and interrupted lectures in a hybrid face-to-face/Zoom setting.

Would you be willing to serve as a Session Moderator?

YES

Keywords

Engaging students, Information-literacy instruction, Active learning, Community engagement, Creating classroom communities

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 1:00 PM Mar 26th, 2:00 PM

Creating Community Engagement in an Information-Literacy, Three-credit Course: An Experiment at Idaho State University

Session Four Breakouts

At Idaho State University the general education program includes an information literacy objective. Students complete courses that fulfill an information-literacy requirement. The library’s three-credit course has been taught since 2013. This presentation outlines how a community of student engagement has been fostered in this course by the presenter. The presentation will include ideas on how to create active learning that focuses on information-literacy development and discussion, including formative assessment, classroom assessment techniques, and effective communication with students.

Specifically, this presentation will report on the efforts to engage students with knowledge surveys, Quizizz/Kahoot! quizzes, breakout room discussions, and interrupted lectures in a hybrid face-to-face/Zoom setting.. The first two minutes of any class is the most important time. Therefore, it is important to avoid logistical matters and dive directly into the most important learning for the day. Come prepared to discuss how to involve your students in a more effective manner that increases learning and motivation.

Typically, classrooms include a lot of back and forth between the instructor and the students. Community engagement means that students freely share their opinions and ideas in a way that helps everyone, including the instructor, to learn. Community engagement means that we care about our students and they feel safe to share their ideas and opinions. Evidence of community engagement in the classroom may be seen when students help each other and teach each other, so there is horizontal communication among students and not just vertical communication from the instructor to the students.