Location

Session Four Breakouts

Type of Presentation

Panel

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

As we all have learned from the COVID-19 pandemic, online teaching is a vital part of creating an open future of learning environments in higher education. Asynchronous online information literacy tutorials can engage and support online and face-to-face library users, and the planning and design process can take many forms. Librarians do not have to be instructional designers, have funding, or be accessibility experts to create engaging, online research tutorials. In this session, a panel of academic and online learning librarians from across the country will discuss creating tutorials with a variety of tools, budgets, and timelines. H5P, LibWizard, Articulate, and homegrown systems will be among the tools discussed. Speakers will present on the planning and implementation process of the tutorials, as well as accessibility considerations. Specific accessibility frameworks will be discussed, such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and WCAG 2.0, as well as free tools and checklists librarians can use to test accessibility. Panelists will share a variety of assessment strategies, including using student workers for usability testing, linking to form assessments, web analytics, and user surveys. In an increasingly digital world, it is essential for academic librarians to be able to create effective and engaging asynchronous learning materials to connect patrons with information literacy concepts. Participants will leave this session ready to jump into their online learning future and make quality content without overthinking it!

Presentation Description

Join this panel of librarians who specialize in online learning and information literacy to hear what drives their tutorial design, what tools they use, and accessibility considerations they take into account. Get inspired to create your own asynchronous, online content as speakers share brief assessment results and ideas for future improvements. This panel will offer practical tips about getting the most out of free and low cost software that will help improve the look and feel of your tutorials.

Session Objectives

Participants will…

  1. Critically examine different design methods and platforms related to online tutorial creation.

  2. Consider how suggested accessibility testing might work at and benefit their own institutions.

  3. Compare and contrast assessment and usability testing strategies to improve research tutorials.

Would you be willing to serve as a Session Moderator?

YES

Keywords

Distance learning, Online tutorials, Information literacy, Virtual engagement, Active learning, Learning outcomes

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 1:00 PM Mar 26th, 2:00 PM

Navigating the Online Tutorial Frontier: From Design to Deployment & Beyond

Session Four Breakouts

As we all have learned from the COVID-19 pandemic, online teaching is a vital part of creating an open future of learning environments in higher education. Asynchronous online information literacy tutorials can engage and support online and face-to-face library users, and the planning and design process can take many forms. Librarians do not have to be instructional designers, have funding, or be accessibility experts to create engaging, online research tutorials. In this session, a panel of academic and online learning librarians from across the country will discuss creating tutorials with a variety of tools, budgets, and timelines. H5P, LibWizard, Articulate, and homegrown systems will be among the tools discussed. Speakers will present on the planning and implementation process of the tutorials, as well as accessibility considerations. Specific accessibility frameworks will be discussed, such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and WCAG 2.0, as well as free tools and checklists librarians can use to test accessibility. Panelists will share a variety of assessment strategies, including using student workers for usability testing, linking to form assessments, web analytics, and user surveys. In an increasingly digital world, it is essential for academic librarians to be able to create effective and engaging asynchronous learning materials to connect patrons with information literacy concepts. Participants will leave this session ready to jump into their online learning future and make quality content without overthinking it!