Presentation Title

Don't Google It! Appeal to Students' Passions to Inspire Information Literacy

Location

PARB 239

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

NA

Abstract

Who doesn’t love Google? Yet in courses all across disciplines at colleges and universities, faculty struggle with assigning work that requires research. Why? Students immediately Google (or use another search engine) to seek information and often ignore requirements to seek information that is relevant, credible, accurate and evidence-based. Despite partnering with librarians, grading with information literacy as a high priority, and guiding students to seek appropriate sources, googling without critical thinking happens on a regular basis. At Brandman University, this frustration for faculty occurs throughout the curriculum, even in courses such as Critical Thinking, Student Success, and Information Literacy, which focus on providing students with necessary skills. In this presentation, the facilitator, who teaches critical thinking in psychology to psychology majors and student success strategies to associate of arts students, will share strategies to win the “Just google it” battle. Strategies include: partnering with instructors across disciplines to share consistent messaging throughout a department and/or university, creating engaging assignments that require students to seek unique “un-google-able” information, and designing assignments that enable students to apply information to their own passions. Participants will enjoy brief exercises to consider how these strategies may work in their own situations and to brainstorm ideas to get them started when they return to their home campuses.

Presentation Description

This presentation will include the facilitator sharing strategies, inviting participants to add their own strategies, and brief activities to help participants apply session content in their own settings.

Session Goals

The facilitator will

1. Inspire participants to inspire their own students to avoid the Google crutch.

2. Support participants to apply strategies to their own situations.

3. Offer tips to motivate students to want to be information literate.

4. Provide opportunities for session colleagues to interact with one another.

Session Objectives

Participants will

1. Define the "Just Google It" challenge

2. Evaluate students' reasons to "just google it."

3. Apply strategies to inspire students to be information literate.

4. Formulate a plan to employ session content at home campus.

Keywords

critical thinking, googling, evidence-based, interdisciplinary

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Feb 22nd, 10:15 AM Feb 22nd, 11:30 AM

Don't Google It! Appeal to Students' Passions to Inspire Information Literacy

PARB 239

Who doesn’t love Google? Yet in courses all across disciplines at colleges and universities, faculty struggle with assigning work that requires research. Why? Students immediately Google (or use another search engine) to seek information and often ignore requirements to seek information that is relevant, credible, accurate and evidence-based. Despite partnering with librarians, grading with information literacy as a high priority, and guiding students to seek appropriate sources, googling without critical thinking happens on a regular basis. At Brandman University, this frustration for faculty occurs throughout the curriculum, even in courses such as Critical Thinking, Student Success, and Information Literacy, which focus on providing students with necessary skills. In this presentation, the facilitator, who teaches critical thinking in psychology to psychology majors and student success strategies to associate of arts students, will share strategies to win the “Just google it” battle. Strategies include: partnering with instructors across disciplines to share consistent messaging throughout a department and/or university, creating engaging assignments that require students to seek unique “un-google-able” information, and designing assignments that enable students to apply information to their own passions. Participants will enjoy brief exercises to consider how these strategies may work in their own situations and to brainstorm ideas to get them started when they return to their home campuses.