Presentation Title

Intersections of Critical Information Literacy and Open Pedagogy: Zines and Wikipedia in the Classroom

Location

PARB 128

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Critical approaches to information literacy invite us to “co-investigate the political, social, and economic dimensions of information, including its creation, access, and use” (Tewell, 2016). Open pedagogical practices offer students opportunities to do work that is available to a public beyond the classroom. Students can “contribute to the knowledge commons, not just consume it, in meaningful and lasting ways...shap[ing] the world as they encounter it” (DeRosa and Jhangiani, 2017). This becomes even more evident when students engage in topics centered on social justice.

As mediums, zines and Wikipedia offer alternative outlets for publishing information on topics that are underrepresented in traditional publishing or not adequately covered by mainstream media. Zine-making and Wikipedia-editing permit diverse stories and histories to become more visible while promoting creative expression, connection, and collaboration among content creators with varying levels of expertise.

In this presentation, the presenter will highlight the cultures of zinesters and Wikipedians, making connections to the culture of “open”, critical information literacy, and open pedagogy. The presenter will also offer ideas and strategies for designing assignments involving zine-making and Wikipedia-editing, using an undergraduate course focused on LGBTQ representations in media taught over four years as a case study. Finally, the presenter will discuss the role(s) libraries and librarians can play in promoting open pedagogical practices in their information literacy initiatives.

Presentation Description

In this presentation, the presenter will discuss zine culture and Wikipedia culture, making connections to the culture of “open”, critical information literacy, and open pedagogy. The presenter will also offer ideas and strategies for designing assignments involving zine-making and Wikipedia-editing, using an undergraduate course focused on LGBTQ representations in media taught over four years as a case study. Finally, the presenter will discuss the role(s) libraries and librarians can play in promoting open pedagogical practices in their information literacy initiatives.

Keywords

open pedagogy; Wikipedia assignments; zine-making; critical information literacy

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Feb 21st, 1:45 PM Feb 21st, 3:00 PM

Intersections of Critical Information Literacy and Open Pedagogy: Zines and Wikipedia in the Classroom

PARB 128

Critical approaches to information literacy invite us to “co-investigate the political, social, and economic dimensions of information, including its creation, access, and use” (Tewell, 2016). Open pedagogical practices offer students opportunities to do work that is available to a public beyond the classroom. Students can “contribute to the knowledge commons, not just consume it, in meaningful and lasting ways...shap[ing] the world as they encounter it” (DeRosa and Jhangiani, 2017). This becomes even more evident when students engage in topics centered on social justice.

As mediums, zines and Wikipedia offer alternative outlets for publishing information on topics that are underrepresented in traditional publishing or not adequately covered by mainstream media. Zine-making and Wikipedia-editing permit diverse stories and histories to become more visible while promoting creative expression, connection, and collaboration among content creators with varying levels of expertise.

In this presentation, the presenter will highlight the cultures of zinesters and Wikipedians, making connections to the culture of “open”, critical information literacy, and open pedagogy. The presenter will also offer ideas and strategies for designing assignments involving zine-making and Wikipedia-editing, using an undergraduate course focused on LGBTQ representations in media taught over four years as a case study. Finally, the presenter will discuss the role(s) libraries and librarians can play in promoting open pedagogical practices in their information literacy initiatives.