Presentation Title

The Common Zine: Responding to the Common Reader as a Community and Building Information Literacy Skills

Location

PARB 227

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

To support NYU Read’s first ever common reading, librarians developed a program that invited the community to respond to Tara Westover’s Educated. In addition to hosting a film series, author talk, and engagement board in the atrium of the library, a collaborative zine program was developed where all members of the community were encouraged to submit their poetry, short stories, photos, riddles, collages, playlists, comics, or any variety of expression to be included in the zine (which will be archived and distributed to the community). Zines have become an increasingly popular source used in and collected by libraries. Several themes related to the book were identified and we provided guidelines for submission which was published in zine format that was shared at various service points in the library and online. Although the program at NYU is not exclusive to first year students, the engagement with the book was mostly conducted in first year programs.

The zine program has larger information literacy implications so we developed outreach strategies that would complement the first year information literacy program already in place. This included providing opt in classes about zines--what they are, how they’re made, and what kind of information is included in them. In future years, the zine program will be used in the first year library classroom to introduce concepts like the creation of information, authority, and evaluation of sources. This presentation will provide attendees with an overview of this program and how it can be incorporated into information literacy instruction.

Presentation Description

Learn how a collaborative zine program that responds to the university’s common reading can inform information literacy practices. In this workshop, participants will hear about one library’s program that sponsored the creation of a collaborative zine by soliciting community contributions that were responded to the book Educated by Tara Westover. Furthermore, the workshop will provide time to consider how zines are used to discuss information literacy concepts such as the creation of information, authority, and source evaluation.

Session Goals

  • Understand how zines can be used to inform information literacy
  • Learn about a strategic program to build community
  • Identify ways to respond to a common reading initiative

Session Objectives

  • Provide an overview of a zine program at one library that was developed in response to a common reading initiative
  • Discuss how zines can inform information literacy competencies
  • Explain one library's process for building collaborations to strengthen engagement

Keywords

zines, common reading, outreach, information literacy, programming

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Feb 21st, 10:00 AM Feb 21st, 11:15 AM

The Common Zine: Responding to the Common Reader as a Community and Building Information Literacy Skills

PARB 227

To support NYU Read’s first ever common reading, librarians developed a program that invited the community to respond to Tara Westover’s Educated. In addition to hosting a film series, author talk, and engagement board in the atrium of the library, a collaborative zine program was developed where all members of the community were encouraged to submit their poetry, short stories, photos, riddles, collages, playlists, comics, or any variety of expression to be included in the zine (which will be archived and distributed to the community). Zines have become an increasingly popular source used in and collected by libraries. Several themes related to the book were identified and we provided guidelines for submission which was published in zine format that was shared at various service points in the library and online. Although the program at NYU is not exclusive to first year students, the engagement with the book was mostly conducted in first year programs.

The zine program has larger information literacy implications so we developed outreach strategies that would complement the first year information literacy program already in place. This included providing opt in classes about zines--what they are, how they’re made, and what kind of information is included in them. In future years, the zine program will be used in the first year library classroom to introduce concepts like the creation of information, authority, and evaluation of sources. This presentation will provide attendees with an overview of this program and how it can be incorporated into information literacy instruction.