Location

Room 218/220

Type of Presentation

Workshop (1 hour and 15 minutes)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

As one of the cornerstones of the CRAAP test to evaluate the validity and usefulness of sources, we rely on the idea of “authority” to inform our evaluation of the source, to decide if it is trustworthy. In the long history of authority, we’ve variously relied on royalty/aristocracy, the Church, professors/the University, the printed word, and the “cultural elite.” In today’s world, all knowledge is available to all people (who are literate and have access to technology) at the click of a mouse or the tap of a finger. The concept of authority has been destabilized and democratized. Credentials don’t matter. Authorities conflict with each other. All truth is just biased opinion. The distrust of historical sources of authority, along with the popularization of the idea of “fake news” and “fake news media”, coupled with the increasingly small number of people who read books, and the theory of confirmation bias, where we each inhabit our own bubble of information, have combined to create an almostan almost toxic (and certainly skewed) view of authority. Who needs authorities when I can find the “truth” on my own? I can crowd-source my answer. So how do we, as teachers of information literacy and critical thinking in the library and the composition classroom, combat this? We must change the conversation and must show students that authority still matters.. WWe will’d like to offer some practical applications and exercises you could can apply to your own classroom and to open up the conversation in ways that may be helpful and encourage students to think critically about who creates information.

Presentation Description

A hands on and interactive presentation that offers practical tips and techniques to get students thinking about the idea of authority, how it has evolved, and when to designate it. This presentation developed from a collaboration between first year writing faculty and library faculty considering the frame “authority is constructed and contextual,” primarily as it relates to and addresses first year students doing research and applying critical thinking skills to evaluate sources.

Keywords

authority, critical thinking skills, hands-on, teaching tips, information literacy, framework, lesson plans

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Sep 28th, 4:40 PM Sep 28th, 5:00 PM

How do we teach authority in a culture where everyone’s an expert?

Room 218/220

As one of the cornerstones of the CRAAP test to evaluate the validity and usefulness of sources, we rely on the idea of “authority” to inform our evaluation of the source, to decide if it is trustworthy. In the long history of authority, we’ve variously relied on royalty/aristocracy, the Church, professors/the University, the printed word, and the “cultural elite.” In today’s world, all knowledge is available to all people (who are literate and have access to technology) at the click of a mouse or the tap of a finger. The concept of authority has been destabilized and democratized. Credentials don’t matter. Authorities conflict with each other. All truth is just biased opinion. The distrust of historical sources of authority, along with the popularization of the idea of “fake news” and “fake news media”, coupled with the increasingly small number of people who read books, and the theory of confirmation bias, where we each inhabit our own bubble of information, have combined to create an almostan almost toxic (and certainly skewed) view of authority. Who needs authorities when I can find the “truth” on my own? I can crowd-source my answer. So how do we, as teachers of information literacy and critical thinking in the library and the composition classroom, combat this? We must change the conversation and must show students that authority still matters.. WWe will’d like to offer some practical applications and exercises you could can apply to your own classroom and to open up the conversation in ways that may be helpful and encourage students to think critically about who creates information.