Location

Room 1220 A/B

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

The threat of plagiarism accusations discourages students from using imitation in their work, and instructors from promoting it. As a result, a valuable pedagogical technique goes unused. This presentation will discuss the evidence in support of imitation as an educational tool and examine why it is widely discouraged. Imitation can serve as a valuable practice, both in course work, and for students’ overall academic success, especially for students as they undergo academic transitions, such as the beginning of their college careers, and the transition from core classes to upper-level major courses. Additionally, the reconsideration of imitation can add value to our understanding, and thus handling of, incidents of plagiarism.

Presentation Description

The threat of plagiarism accusations discourages students from using imitation in their work, and instructors from promoting it. As a result, a valuable pedagogical technique goes unused. This presentation will discuss the evidence in support of imitation, especially for students as they undergo academic transitions, such as the beginning of their college careers, and the transition from core classes to upper-level major courses.

Keywords

Plagiarism, information literacy, composition, patchwriting, imitation, pedagogy

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Sep 28th, 10:00 AM Sep 28th, 10:20 AM

Embracing the Educational Value of Imitation

Room 1220 A/B

The threat of plagiarism accusations discourages students from using imitation in their work, and instructors from promoting it. As a result, a valuable pedagogical technique goes unused. This presentation will discuss the evidence in support of imitation as an educational tool and examine why it is widely discouraged. Imitation can serve as a valuable practice, both in course work, and for students’ overall academic success, especially for students as they undergo academic transitions, such as the beginning of their college careers, and the transition from core classes to upper-level major courses. Additionally, the reconsideration of imitation can add value to our understanding, and thus handling of, incidents of plagiarism.