Presentation Title

A Broader Frame of Reference: Using the ACRL Information Literacy Framework to Develop 21st-century Skills in College Students

Location

Room 1002

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Much of the focus in the analysis of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework in recent years has been on library instruction as a means to advance student abilities to find, evaluate, and use information. This presentation offers a broader perspective that views the ACRL Framework as integral to the development of a wide range of competencies other than information or digital literacies. Today’ global economy requires new skills like critical thinking and problem solving, initiative and self-direction, communication and accountability. Consequently, institutions of higher learning strive to respond to evolving workforce demands affecting what proficiencies the 21st-century student needs.

This presentation argues that academic libraries are well positioned to spearhead the transformative process by advocating for a universal application of the Framework to the entire realm of higher education. The presenter contextualizes the six ACRL frames within the current body of “skills” scholarship to examine how the Framework can be incorporated into the larger University curriculum.

Lastly, the author calls for a new approach to thinking about literacy in the 21st century as the foundation that prepares students to adapt to imminent change in technology, culture, and society. The main take-away for the participants is that a holistic vision of information literacy in higher education is only possible when all constituencies partake in the conversation, including administrators and faculty. Pro-active and well-planned liaison work between a library and academic departments is an effective vehicle to achieve this goal, as the example of the University of Northern Colorado Libraries testifies.

Presentation Description

This presentation situates the ACRL Information Literacy Framework in the broader context of higher education and interprets the six frames as vital for the development of a wider range of competencies other than information or digital literacies. The author uses the example of the University of Northern Colorado Libraries liaison work with faculty and the University administration to discuss steps toward building a more holistic vision of information literacy in academe, while engaging all the key stakeholders in the conversation.

Session Goals

--Examine the applicability of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework outside the library domain and within larger University curricula;

--Establish the relationship between the six "frames" and the comprehensive set of skills and competencies expected from the 21st-century student.

Session Objectives

--Use specific examples of successful librarian-faculty collaboration to create a blueprint of library engagement in re-imagining the notion of literacy and what it means to faculty and students in a mid-size academic institution;

--Facilitate participants' sharing of experiences and feedback on the matter.

Keywords

information literacy; higher education; faculty collaboration

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 28th, 10:00 AM Sep 28th, 10:20 AM

A Broader Frame of Reference: Using the ACRL Information Literacy Framework to Develop 21st-century Skills in College Students

Room 1002

Much of the focus in the analysis of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework in recent years has been on library instruction as a means to advance student abilities to find, evaluate, and use information. This presentation offers a broader perspective that views the ACRL Framework as integral to the development of a wide range of competencies other than information or digital literacies. Today’ global economy requires new skills like critical thinking and problem solving, initiative and self-direction, communication and accountability. Consequently, institutions of higher learning strive to respond to evolving workforce demands affecting what proficiencies the 21st-century student needs.

This presentation argues that academic libraries are well positioned to spearhead the transformative process by advocating for a universal application of the Framework to the entire realm of higher education. The presenter contextualizes the six ACRL frames within the current body of “skills” scholarship to examine how the Framework can be incorporated into the larger University curriculum.

Lastly, the author calls for a new approach to thinking about literacy in the 21st century as the foundation that prepares students to adapt to imminent change in technology, culture, and society. The main take-away for the participants is that a holistic vision of information literacy in higher education is only possible when all constituencies partake in the conversation, including administrators and faculty. Pro-active and well-planned liaison work between a library and academic departments is an effective vehicle to achieve this goal, as the example of the University of Northern Colorado Libraries testifies.