Location

Room 211

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

“I spend hours providing feedback, but I have no idea if my students read it” is a common phrase echoed across college campuses. While best practices in teaching pedagogy laud the feedback cycle, many instructors question the impact their feedback has on their students’ writing. As the feedback loop continues to be a trending cog in the machine of formative assessment and authentic education, an essential component of the loop is often overlooked: the conversation.

Presenters will focus on providing easy-to-implement “conversation” opportunities for students to respond to instructor feedback. This reflective practice provides insight into a student’s learning processes, understanding of the feedback provided, and an open door to growth possibilities. Utilizing a variety of tools, we will explore how feedback conversations can be incorporated into the face-to-face, blended, and online classrooms. Presenters will discuss implementing feedback practices in composition and information literacy courses, providing strategies for faculty/librarian collaboration, on-the-fly implementation, and how to use feedback data to effect sustained change.

The benefit in closing the feedback loop with the conversation piece supports students and instructors in the teaching and learning process. Students feel like they have a voice in their learning by having an outlet to share enduring concerns and appreciation for clarification and the opportunity to improve. Instructors are able to identify “stuck places” where students struggle with content and concepts and build supporting curriculum around those places. For both parties, the process serves as a point of motivation and forward momentum.

Presentation Description

“I spend hours providing feedback, but I have no idea if my students read it!” As the feedback loop continues to be a critical part of formative assessment, the “conversation” component of feedback is often overlooked. Utilizing a variety of tools, this panel will explore how feedback conversations can be incorporated into the face-to-face, blended, and online classrooms. Presenters will discuss feedback practices in composition and information literacy courses, providing strategies for faculty/librarian collaboration, on-the-fly course implementation, and feedback data that effects sustained change.

Keywords

feedback loop, instruction strategies, reflective practice, assessment, collaboration, teaching and learning, scholarly conversation, learning processes, writing prompts

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 28th, 4:40 PM Sep 28th, 5:00 PM

Learning from Failure: Making the Feedback Loop Work

Room 211

“I spend hours providing feedback, but I have no idea if my students read it” is a common phrase echoed across college campuses. While best practices in teaching pedagogy laud the feedback cycle, many instructors question the impact their feedback has on their students’ writing. As the feedback loop continues to be a trending cog in the machine of formative assessment and authentic education, an essential component of the loop is often overlooked: the conversation.

Presenters will focus on providing easy-to-implement “conversation” opportunities for students to respond to instructor feedback. This reflective practice provides insight into a student’s learning processes, understanding of the feedback provided, and an open door to growth possibilities. Utilizing a variety of tools, we will explore how feedback conversations can be incorporated into the face-to-face, blended, and online classrooms. Presenters will discuss implementing feedback practices in composition and information literacy courses, providing strategies for faculty/librarian collaboration, on-the-fly implementation, and how to use feedback data to effect sustained change.

The benefit in closing the feedback loop with the conversation piece supports students and instructors in the teaching and learning process. Students feel like they have a voice in their learning by having an outlet to share enduring concerns and appreciation for clarification and the opportunity to improve. Instructors are able to identify “stuck places” where students struggle with content and concepts and build supporting curriculum around those places. For both parties, the process serves as a point of motivation and forward momentum.