Presentation Title

Negotiating Nuance: Moving Beyond the Credibility Checklist

Location

Rooms 218/220

Type of Presentation

Workshop (1 hour and 15 minutes)

Target Audience

K-12

Abstract

Framing authority as constructed and contextual can be both thrilling and terrifying to K12 teachers and librarians (and for academic librarians, as well!). Well established credibility assessments, including checklist models, fail when students are presented with media formats, when traditional genre containers collapse and converge, and when the options for sharing new knowledge proliferate. Engage with us in exploring strategies for negotiating nuance -- decision making, meaning making, and communicating -- as we construct and recontextualize authority together through one inquiry challenge across media formats.

Panelists will share their own perspectives relating to the need to shift practice beyond black and white determinations of credibility and share individual stories of what information literacy looks like across media, disciplines and grade levels.

Using a variety of inquiry challenges participants will work in groups to examine credibility issues and develop scaffolding for authentic K12 inquiry challenges.

Presentation Description

Contexts for negotiating nuance: In brief (15-min) ignite talks, our panelists will set a framework for thinking about thinking about credibility: Joyce Valenza will suggest a toolkit for for encouraging learners to develop agile strategies to critically evaluate sources, across a range of media including the dynamic nature of content from social media Susan Ballard: will challenge conceptions regarding fact checking as it relates to the customization of news and information content delivery. Kristin Fontichiaro will discuss how some rules of thumb can help our students become more critical readers and more powerful communicators about data and statistics Renee Hobbs considers the power of multiperspectival thinking about contemporary propaganda (including hoaxes, disinformation and memes) as a means to examine how meaning is created through the interaction of reader, text and culture Wendy Stephens will focus on the heightened emphasis on visual literacy in the online realm and how young people in particular make and communicate meaning digitally through visual rather than verbal or textual cues. 2. Developing strategies for thinking and learning (60 min. Participant rotate through two 30-min. choices): Participants will choose to participate in two of the following activities: Joyce: Consider the value of curation as a strategy for modeling credibility decision-making. Activity: Create contextualized HyperDocs scaffolding to support student thinking Susan: Using a continuum, we’ll investigate the rater reliability of news sources (traditional and evolving) related to bias, accuracy and authority. Kristin: We’ll play with some data and how we might use it to create an infographic Renee: Explore evidence of a conspiracy theory and consider diverse critical perspectives to examine how authority is constructed Wendy: We will use filters, stickers, and other tools to alter an image and change its meaning

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 16th, 10:45 AM Sep 16th, 12:00 PM

Negotiating Nuance: Moving Beyond the Credibility Checklist

Rooms 218/220

Framing authority as constructed and contextual can be both thrilling and terrifying to K12 teachers and librarians (and for academic librarians, as well!). Well established credibility assessments, including checklist models, fail when students are presented with media formats, when traditional genre containers collapse and converge, and when the options for sharing new knowledge proliferate. Engage with us in exploring strategies for negotiating nuance -- decision making, meaning making, and communicating -- as we construct and recontextualize authority together through one inquiry challenge across media formats.

Panelists will share their own perspectives relating to the need to shift practice beyond black and white determinations of credibility and share individual stories of what information literacy looks like across media, disciplines and grade levels.

Using a variety of inquiry challenges participants will work in groups to examine credibility issues and develop scaffolding for authentic K12 inquiry challenges.