Presentation Title

Learning Tips that Really Work: How Faculty Collaborated to Invoke Successful Learning Among Their Students

Location

Rooms 218/220

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Designing meaningful learning approaches that make learning “stick” can be a daunting task, one that is further complicated when combined with blended, hybrid, or online learning. Observe how a group of faculty and librarians collaborated in a grassroots movement to improve learning and maximize instructional impact. Using a holistic approach that centers on reflective thinking and writing, supported by feedback and review, faculty have maximized their instruction time by building support (even on the fly) around “stuck places.”

“Stuck places” might include moments in teaching where students struggle with their understanding of an assignment or disciplinary concept, or with finding their own voice in composition. Presenters will demonstrate how a variety of small-scale classroom assessments have changed their approach to teaching and learning.

Students begin making deeper critical connections through inquiry, identifying contextual bias, building counterarguments, and differentiating among types of information sources. This allows students to creatively enter the scholarly conversation and extend their thinking beyond “book report” style research and writing.

This session will address specific techniques in composition and information literacy instruction and their impact on student learning and assessment. Presenters will guide participants in developing their own strategies for supporting students in developing foundational competencies in research and writing. Participants will take home a variety of ideas adapted to their own instructional needs.

Presentation Description

Designing meaningful learning experiences that make learning “stick” can be a daunting task. Through the use of compositional and information literacy techniques, presenters will demonstrate a variety of holistic, easily adapted classroom assessments centered on reflective thinking, writing, and feedback to address “stuck places” in student learning. Participants will develop and adapt a variety of on-the-fly instructional and assessment strategies that support students’ development in foundational competencies in research and writing.

Keywords

Inquiry, scholarly conversation, composition, assessment, feedback, learning improvement, information processing, faculty collaboration, engagement, metacognition

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Sep 15th, 4:15 PM Sep 15th, 5:30 PM

Learning Tips that Really Work: How Faculty Collaborated to Invoke Successful Learning Among Their Students

Rooms 218/220

Designing meaningful learning approaches that make learning “stick” can be a daunting task, one that is further complicated when combined with blended, hybrid, or online learning. Observe how a group of faculty and librarians collaborated in a grassroots movement to improve learning and maximize instructional impact. Using a holistic approach that centers on reflective thinking and writing, supported by feedback and review, faculty have maximized their instruction time by building support (even on the fly) around “stuck places.”

“Stuck places” might include moments in teaching where students struggle with their understanding of an assignment or disciplinary concept, or with finding their own voice in composition. Presenters will demonstrate how a variety of small-scale classroom assessments have changed their approach to teaching and learning.

Students begin making deeper critical connections through inquiry, identifying contextual bias, building counterarguments, and differentiating among types of information sources. This allows students to creatively enter the scholarly conversation and extend their thinking beyond “book report” style research and writing.

This session will address specific techniques in composition and information literacy instruction and their impact on student learning and assessment. Presenters will guide participants in developing their own strategies for supporting students in developing foundational competencies in research and writing. Participants will take home a variety of ideas adapted to their own instructional needs.