Term of Award

Spring 2005

Degree Name

Master of Science in Sport Management (M.S.)

Document Type and Release Option

Thesis (open access)

Department

Department of Health and Kinesiology

Committee Chair

Bryan Riemann

Committee Member 1

Barry Munkasy

Committee Member 2

Steve Elliott

Abstract

Current research has largely focused on the specific actions of individual joints while neglecting the overall pattern of motion and interaction between body segments. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare coordination patterns between man and woman collegiate athletes during static and dynamic activities. Thirty healthy collegiate division-one man and woman athletes participated. They completed a battery of tasks, including the single-leg squat and lateral step-downs while three-dimensional kinematics of the pelvis, thigh, knee, and shank were collected. Using a dynamic systems analysis, coordination patterns were calculated and statistically compared between the sexes. Additionally the stability of the patterns across multiple trials were compared. The results revealed distinct task dependent patterns within each plane of motion however no sex dependent patterns. The underlying etiology for sex related differences requires further study. This information will ultimately contribute to advancing the scientific rationale for neuromuscular training programs striving to prevent injuries.

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