Term of Award

Fall 2010

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Curriculum Studies (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Curriculum, Foundations, and Reading

Committee Chair

Julie G. Maudlin

Committee Member 1

Bob Lake

Committee Member 2

Donald Livingston

Committee Member 3

John Weaver

Abstract

Adolescent girls are continuously barraged with messages regarding what it means to be a girl and the appropriate way in which to do so. Particularly within the South, there are strict boundaries for acceptable forms of femininity both within school and in the broader social context. However, within the walls of the classroom, these lived experiences of girls are often ignored. By ignoring the lived experiences of girls in schools, many girls are being marginalized, trivialized, and dismissed from the school environment. This dissertation examines the hidden curriculum as it applies to adolescent girls in schools today and offers a framework within which I can identify my own experiences as a marginalized female adolescent in the school environment and explores new ways in which educators can include the changing female adolescent body within the school. Through exploring my own autobiographical roots, this work is placed in context of a larger group of adolescent girls within the South struggling with identity development in schools today. Due to the limited access to power and voice girls are granted by their position within the school and society, they often use their bodies as a way to rebel against patriarchal and societal norms. I seek to offer conclusions in the form of a new way to think about curriculum as a bodied text so that curriculum workers, teachers, mothers, and girls themselves may create and find spaces for resistance and new and powerful discourse related to their bodies.

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