Term of Award

Spring 2012

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Education Administration (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development

Committee Chair

Linda M. Arthur

Committee Member 1

Martin Waters

Committee Member 2

Georj Lewis

Abstract

This study examined factors that impact the achievement gap between American male and African American female siblings. The researcher gathered data through interviews and academic artifacts consisting of Georgia's writing test for grades 8th and 11th, the 8th grade Criteria Reference Competency Test results, and Georgia High School Graduation test requirements. Through this qualitative research, participants including : African American male and African American female siblings, African American parents, teachers, and administrators were able to explain personal experiences that impacted the academic success of African American males and African American female siblings. The African American male and African American female siblings, teachers, and administrators were all affiliated with a Southeastern Georgia high school during the 2008-2011 academic school years. Each participant was asked specific interview questions to determine their perspective on factors that impact the achievement gap between African American male and African American female siblings. Factors contributing to the achievement gap between African American male and African American female siblings consist of: (1) social environment, (2) family support, (3) parenting, (4) education, and (5) order of siblings. Data from the study also revealed five 2 themes such as: (1) parent expectation, (2) peer acceptance, (3) school culture. (4) family relationship, and (5) teacher/student relationship that impact the academic success of African American males. In short, African American male students' academic success improved when they are understood, nurtured, and supported.

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