Term of Award

Fall 2007

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Education Administration (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development

Committee Chair

Barbara J. Mallory

Committee Member 1

Linda M. Arthur

Committee Member 2

Bryan W. Griffin

Abstract

This study investigated high school Hispanic students' perceptions of their mathematics or science teachers' interpersonal relationship behaviors. The Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) was completed by 572 high school Hispanic students in Georgia. Of these, 259 high school Hispanic students identified the teacher interpersonal relationships behaviors of their mathematics teacher and 313 students identified the behaviors of their science teacher. Ratings obtained from high school Hispanic students in a district with a large percentage of high school Hispanic students whose scores on the Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) exceeded the reported state pass/pass plus percentage, and ratings from high school Hispanic students in a district with a low percentage of high school Hispanic students whose scores on the GHSGT were below the reported pass/pass plus percentage for Hispanic students were compared. Differences between ratings obtained in science and mathematics classes were also compared for discussion using descriptive statistics and statistical analysis. Further statistical analysis of the relationship among demographic factors, parental/community factors, and selfreported final grade in mathematics or science, and the reported teacher interpersonal relationship behaviors was reported. On the QTI, high school Hispanic students ranked the teachers Leadership, Understanding, and Helpful/Friendly Behaviors with the highest means and Admonishing, Dissatisfied, and Uncertain Behaviors with the lowest means. High school Hispanic students who reported a final grade of 90-100 in mathematics, reported high means on the Strict, Admonishing, Uncertain, and Dissatisfied Behaviors domains. High school Hispanic students who reported a final grade of 90-100 in science, reported higher means in the Admonishing, Strict, Uncertain, and Dissatisfied Behaviors domains than high school Hispanic students who reported a failing grade. The interaction between the percentage of Hispanic students in a district and the subject area (mathematics/science) was significant in the Understanding, Admonishing, and Helpful/Friendly Behaviors domains. The majority of the students reported that their parents were involved in decisions regarding their high school program. Community members, outside of the immediate family, did not get involved in decisions regarding the students high school program.

Share

COinS