Title

Situational Influences on Experiences of Long-Distance Hikers

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2018

Publication Title

Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership

DOI

10.18666/JOREL-2018-V10-I3-7536

Abstract

The Appalachian Trail (AT), Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), and Continental Divide Trail (CDT) are arguably the most popular long-distance hiking routes in the United States. With increasing need for recreational space, these trails are experiencing heavier visitation and impact. Research on the experiences of long-distance hikers can be used as a means of justifying funding for the management of the AT, PCT, CDT, and other long-distance trails. This study used the Benefits of Hiking Scale to determine whether benefits of participation and components of means-end theory varied based on the duration and location of long-distance hiking experiences. The study used an online survey to collect data from 292 hikers, who were classified as non-thru-hikers, AT thru-hikers, or thru-hikers of other long-distance trails. The number of thru-hikes completed in the last 10 years was also calculated. Results suggest that non-thru-hikers seek to maintain or improve physical health to a greater degree than thru-hikers, who appear to be motivated by other aspects of the hiking experience.

Comments

Copyright (c) 2018 Sagamore Publishing LLC

Share

COinS