Event Title

Stirrup Some Service

Location

Georgia Southern University- Williams Center

Faculty Mentors

Dr. Kropp and Dr. Maurer

Course Name

FYE 1410 H

Session Type

Undergraduate Poster Presentation

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

18-4-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

April 2018

Description

Statesboro, Georgia is a town with an unassuming need for a therapeutic, social program with a focus on individuals with disabilities. Haley Dent, with Statesboro-Bulloch Parks and Recreation, is implementing such a project at Stirrup Some Fun, an equine-therapy-based riding experience that celebrates the strengths of each participant while challenging them to encourage growth. The triumphs of each rider, such as an increased range of motion, improved flexibility, and enhanced motor skills can be observed physically during each session, but successes such as high self-esteem and more efficient communication can be observed as well as felt by all involved. Literature on animal-assisted therapy suggests that the physical benefits last only as long as the treatment, but the character development and maturation achieved by the participants lasts a lifetime.

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Apr 18th, 12:00 PM Apr 18th, 12:00 AM

Stirrup Some Service

Georgia Southern University- Williams Center

Statesboro, Georgia is a town with an unassuming need for a therapeutic, social program with a focus on individuals with disabilities. Haley Dent, with Statesboro-Bulloch Parks and Recreation, is implementing such a project at Stirrup Some Fun, an equine-therapy-based riding experience that celebrates the strengths of each participant while challenging them to encourage growth. The triumphs of each rider, such as an increased range of motion, improved flexibility, and enhanced motor skills can be observed physically during each session, but successes such as high self-esteem and more efficient communication can be observed as well as felt by all involved. Literature on animal-assisted therapy suggests that the physical benefits last only as long as the treatment, but the character development and maturation achieved by the participants lasts a lifetime.