Individual Presentation or Panel Title

The Theoretically Ideal Curriculum Statement: Reflections of a Curriculum Student

Abstract

Curriculum students are often required to identify with various theories and philosophical perspectives from the onset of their curriculum studies. Generally, we present these as opposing forces, and students often feel that one set of goals for instruction (usually the more recent) is more superior to the others. Curriculum workers have struggled to present varying perspectives of the curriculum as a united voice of hope for a better world. In this personal reflection, I lament, as well as express my desire for a more unified future. I contribute to the progressive development of the field by presenting a curriculum statement representing the eclectic: the fusion of all perspectives. I revisit the popular factory model of education and ask the reader to consider the requirements of life outside of the factory while considering the inescapable necessity of modern-day factory skills. I conclude with a poem that I wrote during one of my meditative moments of currere—a poem of unity and a common methodology.

Presentation Description

Curriculum students are often required to identify with various theories and philosophical perspectives from the onset of their curriculum studies. Generally, we present these as opposing forces, and students often feel that one set of goals for instruction (usually the more recent) is more superior to the others. Curriculum workers have struggled to present varying perspectives of the curriculum as a united voice of hope for a better world. In this personal reflection, I lament, as well as express my desire for a more unified future. I contribute to the progressive development of the field by presenting a curriculum statement representing the eclectic: the fusion of all perspectives. I revisit the popular factory model of education and ask the reader to consider the requirements of life outside of the factory while considering the inescapable necessity of modern-day factory skills. I conclude with a poem that I wrote during one of my meditative moments of currere—a poem of unity and a common methodology.

Location

Stream C: Curriculum Dialogues

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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The Theoretically Ideal Curriculum Statement: Reflections of a Curriculum Student

Stream C: Curriculum Dialogues

Curriculum students are often required to identify with various theories and philosophical perspectives from the onset of their curriculum studies. Generally, we present these as opposing forces, and students often feel that one set of goals for instruction (usually the more recent) is more superior to the others. Curriculum workers have struggled to present varying perspectives of the curriculum as a united voice of hope for a better world. In this personal reflection, I lament, as well as express my desire for a more unified future. I contribute to the progressive development of the field by presenting a curriculum statement representing the eclectic: the fusion of all perspectives. I revisit the popular factory model of education and ask the reader to consider the requirements of life outside of the factory while considering the inescapable necessity of modern-day factory skills. I conclude with a poem that I wrote during one of my meditative moments of currere—a poem of unity and a common methodology.