Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Make Philosophical Paradigms Work for You: An Interactive Workshop on Applying Paradigms in Your Inquiry

Abstract

Philosophical paradigms, or the “systems of beliefs and practices that influence how researchers select both the questions they study and methods that they use to study them” (Morgan, 2007, p. 49), influence our practices, relationships, and even our thinking during the inquiry process. However, we are often not taught how to identify these paradigms in our own and others’ work nor how to intentionally use them.

The purpose of this interactive workshop is to introduce philosophical paradigms and strategies for how to apply them to our inquiry processes. I will share my own struggles with using and learning paradigms and how I have changed the narrative to making paradigms more applicable to my work. After completing this workshop, audience members will be able to:

Define what a research philosophical “paradigm” is and where it comes from, Distinguish between philosophical paradigms and theoretical frameworks, Identify key characteristics of 5 common paradigms in social sciences, Identify their own paradigm, Discuss where and how paradigms influence the inquiry process, and Imagine how your own paradigm will influence your a) practices and b) your relationships during future/current inquiries.

Pending the final format for the CSSC, I plan to use some of the following pedagogical techniques: brief lectures, large group discussion, small group discussions, personal reflection and writing, and question and answer discussions. I plan to have an ADA compliant PDF of presentation slides along with handouts for the audience (electronic or paper) as well as a list of resources for their future learning.

Presentation Description

Philosophical paradigms, or the “systems of beliefs and practices that influence how researchers select both the questions they study and methods that they use to study them” (Morgan, 2007, p. 49), influence our practices, relationships, and even our thinking during the inquiry process. However, we are often not taught how to identify these paradigms in our own and others’ work nor how to intentionally use them. The purpose of this interactive workshop is to introduce philosophical paradigms and strategies for how to apply them to our inquiry processes. I will share my own struggles with using and learning paradigms and how I have changed the narrative to making paradigms more applicable to my work. After completing this workshop, audience members will be able to: Define what a research philosophical “paradigm” is and where it comes from, Distinguish between philosophical paradigms and theoretical frameworks, Identify key characteristics of 5 common paradigms in social sciences, Identify their own paradigm, Discuss where and how paradigms influence the inquiry process, and Imagine how your own paradigm will influence your a) practices and b) your relationships during future/current inquiries. Pending the final format for the CSSC, I plan to use some of the following pedagogical techniques: brief lectures, large group discussion, small group discussions, personal reflection and writing, and question and answer discussions. I plan to have an ADA compliant PDF of presentation slides along with handouts for the audience (electronic or paper) as well as a list of resources for their future learning.

Location

Stream C: The Emergent Scholar

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 12th, 2:30 PM Jun 12th, 3:30 PM

Make Philosophical Paradigms Work for You: An Interactive Workshop on Applying Paradigms in Your Inquiry

Stream C: The Emergent Scholar

Philosophical paradigms, or the “systems of beliefs and practices that influence how researchers select both the questions they study and methods that they use to study them” (Morgan, 2007, p. 49), influence our practices, relationships, and even our thinking during the inquiry process. However, we are often not taught how to identify these paradigms in our own and others’ work nor how to intentionally use them.

The purpose of this interactive workshop is to introduce philosophical paradigms and strategies for how to apply them to our inquiry processes. I will share my own struggles with using and learning paradigms and how I have changed the narrative to making paradigms more applicable to my work. After completing this workshop, audience members will be able to:

Define what a research philosophical “paradigm” is and where it comes from, Distinguish between philosophical paradigms and theoretical frameworks, Identify key characteristics of 5 common paradigms in social sciences, Identify their own paradigm, Discuss where and how paradigms influence the inquiry process, and Imagine how your own paradigm will influence your a) practices and b) your relationships during future/current inquiries.

Pending the final format for the CSSC, I plan to use some of the following pedagogical techniques: brief lectures, large group discussion, small group discussions, personal reflection and writing, and question and answer discussions. I plan to have an ADA compliant PDF of presentation slides along with handouts for the audience (electronic or paper) as well as a list of resources for their future learning.